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How have African Americans shaped the culture of the United States throughout history? Tracing the accomplishments and obstacles of African Americans from the slave trade through emancipation, and to the modern African diaspora, you will learn about the political, economic, social, religious, and cultural factors that have influenced African American life. In African American History, you’ll come face to face with individuals who changed the course of history and learn more about slavery, racism, and the Civil Rights Movement. You will also explore how the history of African Americans influences current events today.

This course is the first in a two-course sequence. In the course, students will learn about algebraic concepts such as integers, linear equations, inequalities and factoring. As students work through each interactive lesson, they will have the opportunity to complete several self-check activities and journal entries. Ultimately, this course will assist students in developing fundamental algebraic skills that will allow them to use problem-solving strategies in real-world situations as well as using graphing technology to interpret, represent and communicate mathematical concepts.

This course is the second in a two-course sequence. In the course, students will learn about algebraic concepts such as integers, linear equations, inequalities and factoring. As students work through each interactive lesson, they will have the opportunity to complete several self-check activities and journal entries. Ultimately, this course will assist students in developing fundamental algebraic skills that will allow them to use problem-solving strategies in real-world situations as well as using graphing technology to interpret, represent and communicate mathematical concepts.

This course is the first semester of a full year of Algebra 2. This CCSS-aligned course further develops students’ understanding of algebraic functions and their applications. A major theme is the generalization of concepts and techniques from Algebra 1 and Geometry. Polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, rational and trigonometric functions are studied, and basic properties of complex numbers are introduced. Algebra 2A is the first semester in a two-semester course. In this semester, students will cover functions and polynomials, equations and inequalities, factoring and quadratics, conic sections, and radical and complex numbers.

This CCSS-aligned course further develops students’ understanding of algebraic functions and their applications. A major theme is the generalization of concepts and techniques from Algebra 1 and Geometry. Polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, rational and trigonometric functions are studied, and basic properties of complex numbers are introduced. Algebra 2B is the second semester in a two-semester course. In this semester, students will cover dividing and solving polynomials, rational expressions, exponential and logarithmic functions, sequences and series, and trigonometric functions, and probability and statistics.

This is the first course in a two-course sequence. Two major themes for this course are “Leadership at Home” and “Leadership in Society.” Students will address several essential questions related to these themes while reading a variety of works by American authors. In addition to major works, students will read short stories and informational texts, engage in poetry analysis, view informational videos, and write for various purposes. Larger writing assignments include an informative essay and a major research project. Students partake in grammar challenges where they learn about grammar concepts and develop a mastery of their use. In addition to building their writing skills, students learn several reading strategies such as how to use graphic organizers to extract important information, take Cornell notes for an informational text or during a lecture, and summarize to monitor comprehension. Furthermore, students will explore several rhetorical devices and strategies like symbolism, dialect, author’s purpose, foreshadowing, persuasive devices, setting and more.

This is the second course in a two-course sequence and has been redesigned to align to the Common Core Standards. Two major themes for this semester are “Becoming My Own Leader” and “Leading Others.” Students will address several essential questions related to these themes while reading a variety of works by American authors. In addition to major works, students will read short stories and informational texts, engage in poetry analysis, view informational videos, and write for various purposes. Larger writing assignments include an argument essay, a narrative essay, and a business email. As a supplement to these assignments, students will partake in grammar challenges where they learn about grammar concepts and develop a mastery of their use. In addition to building their writing skills, students learn several reading strategies such as how to use graphic organizers to extract important information, take Cornell notes for an informational text or during a lecture, and summarize to monitor comprehension. Furthermore, students will explore several rhetorical devices and strategies like characterization, allusion, word choice and diction, setting, symbolism, point of view, and more.

This course is the first in a two-course sequence. This course presents a fascinating, in-depth exploration of the structure and function of the human body. The course will use a systems approach and will emphasize how organs and body systems work together to carry on complex processes. Concepts and principles will be related to familiar health issues, problems and experiences we face as humans. Upon completion of this course, students will have a thorough understanding of the human body and how its parts work together to maintain the delicate equilibrium of life.

This course is the second in a two-course sequence. This course presents a fascinating, in-depth exploration of the structure and function of the human body. The course will use a systems approach and will emphasize how organs and body systems work together to carry on complex processes. Concepts and principles will be related to familiar health issues, problems and experiences we face as humans. Upon completion of this course, students will have a thorough understanding of the human body and how its parts work together to maintain the delicate equilibrium of life.

The aim of anthropology is to use a broad approach to gain an understanding of the past, present, and future, as well as address the problems humans face in biological, social, and cultural life. This course will explore the evolution, similarity and diversity of mankind through time. It will look at how we have evolved from a biologically and culturally weak species to one that has the ability to cause catastrophic change or amazing innovation, shedding light on how we forged our way and developed all of the things that make us human, such as our cultures, languages, and religions. Exciting online video journeys to different areas of the world will also be presented in this course.

This course is the first semester of a two-semester sequence, aligned to the Advanced Placement curriculum for Biology. The course provides an overview of cell biology, evolution, genetics, ecology, as well as the structure and function of plant and animal systems. In AP Biology, students build the conceptual framework necessary to understand science as a process. Course does not include the AP Exam; students can contact their school’s AP Coordinator or the College Board to sign up to take the Exam. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

This course is the second semester of a two-semester sequence, aligned to the Advanced Placement curriculum for Biology. The course provides an overview of cell biology, evolution, genetics, ecology, as well as the structure and function of plant and animal systems. In AP Biology, students build the conceptual framework necessary to understand science as a process. Course does not include the AP Exam; students can contact their school’s AP Coordinator or the College Board to sign up to take the Exam. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

This course is the first semester of a two-semester sequence. The course is aligned to the Advanced Placement curriculum for Calculus AB and covers calculus principles such as derivatives, integrals, limits, approximation, and applications and modeling. Students will gain experience in the use of calculus methods and learn how calculus methods may be applied to practical applications. Course does not include the AP Exam; students can contact their school’s AP Coordinator or the College Board to sign up to take the Exam. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

This course is the second semester of a two-semester sequence. The course is aligned to the Advanced Placement curriculum for Calculus AB and covers calculus principles such as derivatives, integrals, limits, approximation, and applications and modeling. Students will gain experience in the use of calculus methods and learn how calculus methods may be applied to practical applications. Course does not include the AP Exam; students can contact their school’s AP Coordinator or the College Board to sign up to take the Exam. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

This course is the first semester of a two-semester sequence. The course is aligned to the Advanced Placement curriculum for Calculus BC and covers calculus principles such as derivatives, integrals, limits, approximation, and applications and modeling. AP Calculus BC covers the same topics as AP Calculus AB plus additional ones. Students will gain experience in the use of calculus methods and learn how calculus methods may be applied to practical applications. Course does not include the AP Exam; students can contact their school’s AP Coordinator or the College Board to sign up to take the Exam. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

This course is the second semester of a two-semester sequence. The course is aligned to the Advanced Placement curriculum for Calculus BC and covers calculus principles such as derivatives, integrals, limits, approximation, and applications and modeling. AP Calculus BC covers the same topics as AP Calculus AB plus additional ones. Students will gain experience in the use of calculus methods and learn how calculus methods may be applied to practical applications. Course does not include the AP Exam; students can contact their school’s AP Coordinator or the College Board to sign up to take the Exam. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

This is the first semester of a full-year AP Chemistry course that provides students with a college-level foundation to support future advanced coursework in chemistry. Students cultivate their understanding of chemistry through inquiry-based investigations, as they explore content such as: atomic structure, intermolecular forces and bonding, chemical reactions, kinetics, thermodynamics, and equilibrium.

This is the second semester of a full-year AP Chemistry course that provides students with a college-level foundation to support future advanced coursework in chemistry. Students cultivate their understanding of chemistry through inquiry-based investigations, as they explore content such as: atomic structure, intermolecular forces and bonding, chemical reactions, kinetics, thermodynamics, and equilibrium.

This is the first semester in a two-semester sequence and provides students with college level instruction in studying and writing various kinds of analytic or persuasive essays on literary and nonliterary topics in language, rhetoric and expository writing. Students will become skilled readers of prose written in various periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts. Both their reading and writing should make students aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects as well as the way writing conventions and language contribute to effectiveness in writing. This course will effectively prepare students for the AP Exam by enabling them to read, comprehend, and write about complex texts, while developing further communication skills on a college level. Course does not include the AP Exam; students can contact their school’s AP Coordinator or the College Board to sign up to take the Exam. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

This is the second semester in a two-semester sequence and provides students with college level instruction in studying and writing various kinds of analytic or persuasive essays on literary and nonliterary topics in language, rhetoric and expository writing. Students will become skilled readers of prose written in various periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts. Both their reading and writing should make students aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects as well as the way writing conventions and language contribute to effectiveness in writing. This course will effectively prepare students for the AP Exam by enabling them to read, comprehend, and write about complex texts, while developing further communication skills on a college level. Course does not include the AP Exam; students can contact their school’s AP Coordinator or the College Board to sign up to take the Exam. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

Limited Course Capacity

We’re sorry to inform you that we have reached capacity for several of our Semester 1 and Trimester 1 courses. You’ll notice when attempting to enroll students in our Student Learning Portal that some courses are unavailable. While we are no longer accepting new enrollments for these courses at this time, many courses continue to remain open for enrollment.

With many students across the state 100% remote, demand for our online courses is greater than ever before. Because every course we offer is taught by a Michigan-certified teacher, this high volume of enrollments has created capacity issues for our teachers who provide each and every student with individual feedback.

While the Michigan Virtual team anticipated and planned for significant increases in student enrollments this Fall, the increased demand we’ve experienced has been unprecedented. As a result, we are taking steps to hire even more part-and full-time teachers to support larger numbers of student enrollments for Semester 2 as well as for Trimester 2 and 3. 

For schools that still need online learning options this year, please fill out the form at the bottom of our virtual pathways page to meet with someone to discuss other solutions. While some of our teacher-led courses are full, we may still have the capacity to help you in upcoming terms or can discuss timing to implement a whole-school or collaborative program in which local teachers from your school/district use our online course content to teach students. We also have free course content and resources available for you to use.

We know this is an incredibly stressful time for all, and we’re sorry if the courses you’re looking for are unavailable. We never want to turn away a student who wants to learn from us. Our top concern, however, is student success, and we have a policy to not take on additional enrollments if we cannot guarantee that all students will have a quality online learning experience. 

We appreciate your patience and understanding as we navigate the unusually high volume of enrollments we are receiving.