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Course Name

Accounting A

Subject Mathematics
Grade Level High School

Description

This is the first course in a two-semester Accounting course sequence. Accounting A is a skill-level course that is of value to all students, whether exploring a career in business or for personal financial needs. Accounting A is an essential course for students who are pursuing a strong background in business, marketing and management. This course covers the complete accounting cycle for a proprietorship, along with journalizing and posting transactions. Prerequisites: None

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to identify the various elements and concepts of accounting; analyze transactions into debits and credits; record journal transactions; post transactions; explain various banking systems; practice accounting skills using financial accounting worksheets; prepare financial statements for proprietorships; and follow through to the completion of the accounting cycle.

Course Outline:

Unit 1: Accounting Foundations

Unit 2: Analyzing Transactions into Debit and Credit Parts

Unit 3: Recording Journal Transactions

Unit 4: Posting Transactions

Unit 5: Banking Systems

Unit 6: Financial Accounting Worksheets

Unit 7: Preparing Financial Statements for Proprietorships

Unit 8: Completion of the Accounting Cycle

Resources Included: Aplia accounting software from Cengage Learning.  Online lesson instruction and activities, opportunities to engage with a certified, online instructor and classmates, when appropriate, and online assessments to measure student performance of course objectives and readiness for subsequent academic pursuits. 

Additional Costs: None. If students encounter a prompt to pay for Aplia, then this indicates that the Aplia classroom is not properly assigned to Michigan Virtual’s account with Cengage Learning.  In this event, the student should contact his/her instructor. S/he may temporarily use the free temporary Aplia account while free access is resolved.

Scoring System: Michigan Virtual does not assign letter grades, grant credit for courses, nor issue diplomas. A final score out of total points earned will be submitted to your school mentor for conversion to their own letter grading system.

Time Commitment: Semester sessions are 18-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1 or more hours per day in the course to be successful. Summer sessions are 10 weeks long: Students must be able to spend a minimum of 2 or more hours per day, or about 90 hours during the summer, for the student to be successful in any course. Trimester sessions are 12-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1.5 or more hours per day in the course to be successful.

Technology Requirements: Students will require a computer device with headphones, a microphone, webcam, up-to-date Chrome Web Browser, and access to YouTube.

Please review the Michigan Virtual Technology Requirements: https://michiganvirtual.org/about/support/knowledge-base/technical-requirements/.

Instructor Support System: For technical issues within your course, contact the Customer Care Center by email at CustomerCare@mivu.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Instructor Contact Expectations: Students can use email or the private message system within the Student Learning Portal to access highly qualified teachers when they need instructor assistance. Students will also receive feedback on their work inside the learning management system. The Instructor Info area of their course may describe additional communication options.

Academic Support Available: In addition to access to a highly qualified, Michigan certified teacher, students have access to academic videos and outside resources verified by Michigan Virtual. For technical issues within the course, students can contact the Michigan Virtual Customer Care by email at customercare@michiganvirtual.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Required Assessment: Online assessments consist of formative and summative assessments represented by computer-graded multiple choice, instructor-graded writing assignments including hands-on projects, model building and other forms of authentic assessments.

Technical Skills Needed: No special skills are required beyond being able to operate a computer and use word processing software.

Additional Information: Aplia access in Accounting A will also be used in Accounting B during the same academic year.

Course Name

Accounting B

Subject Mathematics
Grade Level High School

Description

This is the second course in a two-semester Accounting course sequence. This course is a continuation of Accounting A. In Accounting B, students will expand their knowledge of accounting procedures by working within the structure of a corporation. Competency will be exhibited in completing payroll taxes and reports, special journals and other financial statements. Prerequisites: Accounting A

Course Objectives: At the completion of this second semester of the year-long Accounting course sequence, students will be able to record purchase and cash payment transactions; record sales and cash receipts transactions; work with both general and subsidiary ledgers; create accounting entries and accounting reports for payrolls; build worksheets for depreciation and dividends; develop corporate financial statements, and determine ending fiscal period transactions.

Course Outline: This is the second semester of a two-semester course.

Unit 9: Recording Purchase and Cash Payment Transactions

Unit 10: Recording Sales and Cash Receipts Transactions

Unit 11: General and Subsidiary Ledgers

Unit 12: Payroll Accounting Entries

Unit 13: Payroll Accounting Reports

Unit 14: Worksheets for Depreciation and Dividends

Unit 15: Corporate Financial Statements

Unit 16: Ending Fiscal Period Transactions

Resources Included: Aplia accounting software from Cengage Learning.  Online lesson instruction and activities, opportunities to engage with a certified, online instructor and classmates, when appropriate, and online assessments to measure student performance of course objectives and readiness for subsequent academic pursuits.

Additional Costs: None.  If students encounter a prompt to pay for Aplia, then this indicates that the Aplia classroom is not properly assigned to Michigan Virtual’s account with Cengage Learning.  In this event, the student should contact his/her instructor. S/he may temporarily use the free temporary Aplia account while free access is resolved.

Scoring System: Michigan Virtual does not assign letter grades, grant credit for courses, nor issue diplomas. A final score out of total points earned will be submitted to your school mentor for conversion to their own letter grading system.

Time Commitment: Semester sessions are 18-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1 or more hours per day in the course to be successful. Summer sessions are 10 weeks long: Students must be able to spend a minimum of 2 or more hours per day, or about 90 hours during the summer, for the student to be successful in any course. Trimester sessions are 12-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1.5 or more hours per day in the course to be successful.

Technology Requirements: Students will require a computer device with headphones, a microphone, webcam, up-to-date Chrome Web Browser, and access to YouTube.

Please review the Michigan Virtual Technology Requirements: https://michiganvirtual.org/about/support/knowledge-base/technical-requirements/.

Instructor Support System: For technical issues within your course, contact the Customer Care Center by email at CustomerCare@mivu.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Instructor Contact Expectations: Students can use email or the private message system within the Student Learning Portal to access highly qualified teachers when they need instructor assistance. Students will also receive feedback on their work inside the learning management system. The Instructor Info area of their course may describe additional communication options.

Academic Support Available: In addition to access to a highly qualified, Michigan certified teacher, students have access to academic videos and outside resources verified by Michigan Virtual. For technical issues within the course, students can contact the Michigan Virtual Customer Care by email at customercare@michiganvirtual.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Required Assessment: Online assessments consist of formative and summative assessments represented by computer-graded multiple choice, instructor-graded writing assignments including hands-on projects, model building and other forms of authentic assessments.

Technical Skills Needed: No special skills are required beyond being able to operate a computer and use word processing software.

Additional Information: Aplia access in Accounting A will be used in Accounting B during the same academic year.

Course Name

Advanced Programming: Game Design & Animation

Subject Other
Grade Level High School

Description

Students completing the Game Design: Animation and Simulation course will gain an understanding of the fundamental principles used at every stage of the game creation process. First, game genres and modes of play are explored in terms of the psychology of incentives, motivation to play, and social networking. Next, virtual characters and non-player characters are reviewed from concept drawing to 2D and 3D art, rigging, and animation. Next, level design, storytelling, and animation are added to develop a virtual world around the characters. These same techniques are at work in training simulator systems, virtual shopping experiences, augmented reality, and a number of other important career options. In addition to writing computer code, students should also expect to engage in drawing, illustration, storytelling and character development in the course of utilizing game design and animation technology. Prerequisites:Game Design is an advanced programming course that assumes that students have already successfully completed previous coursework introducing them to computer science principles and programming languages. Students should have previously completed at least two semesters of one or more of the following courses or their equivalents: Foundations of Programming, Intro to Java, Advanced Web Design: Javascript, AP Computer Science A, or AP Computer Science Principles.

Course Objectives: In completing the modules of study in this course, students will be able to answer or demonstrate performance of the following essential questions.

How does the game design process facilitate the development of a game?

What questions do game designers need to ask before they start to work on the design of a game?

What are the key roles in the game design and development process?

How does the testing phase help in the development of a game?

What are the types of games that can be made, and the tools that make them?

Do games need a narrative in order to be a successful?

What are the most basic terms used in game development, and 3D in particular?

What are 3D game development tools like?

How do I create basic game objects in a 3D environment?

How do I add basic cameras and lights in a 3D game?

What are the steps required to give the user control over the game?

How are basic materials added and edited for 3D objects?

What are some basic animation techniques for 3D objects?

How do collisions occur, and what types are there?

What are components of game objects, how are they created and assigned?

How is a script created and assigned in a 3D game?

How does basic scoring work in a video game?

What are the steps to “build” and share a 3D game with others?

What are some common features between games in 3D game development?

What are the types of lighting that can affect a game?

How is basic 3D animation created?

What are the steps to creating and applying a realistic material to a 3D object?

How does shooting projectiles occur?

What are the steps of creating collisions and explosions with projectiles?

What is spawning, and how are individual objects and series of objects spawned into games?

What are the basic building blocks of 2D games?

What are the similarities between 3D and 2D game development?

How do components and collisions work in a 2D game?

What are the camera types and user controls in a 2D game?

What are the differences between types of moving and non-moving game objects as they relate to game physics?

How do we add more complex animations to a 2D game for characters?

What are “states” of an item or character?

How do we control and react to changes in state of an object?

What are the steps to create a display of scores, health, etc. to the user?

How can a user progress to other levels within a game?

What is Augmented Reality (AR)?

What is Virtual Reality (VR)?

What situations are ideal for augmented reality?

What are some examples of augmented reality today?

How does a device sense things like location, direction, or images?

What are the key steps in developing an AR experience?

How do you create objects that can be used in AR?

How do you brainstorm with a team?

How do you prioritize items, issues and tasks?

What communication tools are best for development and collaboration?

What are good systems to develop, optimize, and track versions of software developed?

How do you adapt a plan as you approach a deadline

Course Outline:

Module 1: Understanding the Game Development Process

Module 2: Introduction to Game Engines and Essentials

Module 3: Advanced Scripting and Animation Techniques

Module 4: 2D Game Development Concepts

Module 5: Advanced 2D Game Development

Module 6: Augmented Reality and Geolocation

Module 7: Game Design, Development and Deployment

Resources Included: Online lesson instruction and activities, opportunities to engage with a certified, online instructor and classmates, when appropriate, and online assessments to measure student performance of course objectives and readiness for subsequent academic pursuits.

Additional Costs: None.

Scoring System: Michigan Virtual does not assign letter grades, grant credit for courses, nor issue diplomas. A final score out of total points earned will be submitted to your school mentor for conversion to their own letter grading system.

Time Commitment: Semester sessions are 18-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1 or more hours per day in the course to be successful. Summer sessions are 10 weeks long: Students must be able to spend a minimum of 2 or more hours per day, or about 90 hours during the summer, for the student to be successful in any course. Trimester sessions are 12-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1.5 or more hours per day in the course to be successful.

Techno

Course Name

Advanced Web Design: JavaScript

Subject Other
Grade Level High School

Description

JavaScript is one of the 3 languages all web developers must learn:

1. HTML to define the content of web pages

2. CSS to specify the layout of web pages

3. JavaScript to program the behavior of web pages

In this course, students will learn how to start programming with JavaScript. Students will learn the basics of JavaScript including testing, functions, objects, arrays, loops, conditional code, operators and syntax basics. Students will learn timing and animations, and how to debug. The class will conclude with a robust project that incorporates everything they learned in the semester. Students should have a working knowledge of HTML and CSS prior to taking this course. Prerequisites: Completion of both (1) Basic Web Design: HTML & CSS; (2) Foundations of Programming, Intro to Java, or an equivalent introductory computer science programming course.

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to…

Use variable naming rules and JavaScript data types.

Use and understand expressions and operators.

Understand and use objects and arrays.

Define functions and methods.

Understand the Document Object Model (DOM).

Understand how to Get Input and Output.

Manage web page Styles using JavaScript and CSS.

Handle Web Page Events

Script Tables

Script Forms

Course Outline:

Module 1: Intro to JavaScript

Module 2: Handling the Data

Module 3: Processing the Data

Module 4: Making a Change

Module 5: Finishing Touches

Module 6: Application and Review

Resources Included: Online lesson instruction and activities, opportunities to engage with a certified, online instructor and classmates, when appropriate, and online assessments to measure student performance of course objectives and readiness for subsequent academic pursuits.

Additional Costs: None.

Scoring System: Michigan Virtual does not assign letter grades, grant credit for courses, nor issue diplomas. A final score out of total points earned will be submitted to your school mentor for conversion to their own letter grading system.

Time Commitment: Semester sessions are 18-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1 or more hours per day in the course to be successful. Summer sessions are 10 weeks long: Students must be able to spend a minimum of 2 or more hours per day, or about 90 hours during the summer, for the student to be successful in any course. Trimester sessions are 12-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1.5 or more hours per day in the course to be successful.

Technology Requirements:

Students will need a computer or laptop for this course; tablets are not sufficient

For this course, you will have several videos from YouTube, so make sure you are able to view them.

Other requirements: Internet Access, Word Processor, Email Access

HTML Text Editor (choose one):

TextEdit – For use on Mac – comes with OS

Notepad – For use on Windows – comes with OS

Text – For use on Chromebook – free app download from the Google Store

Image Editing Software (choose one):

Pixlr – https://pixlr.com/editor/(in-browser)

GIMP – http://www.gimp.org/downloads/(downloadable program)

Web Hosting and basic in-browser FTP: Neocities – https://www.neocities.org

Students will require a computer device with headphones, a microphone, webcam, up-to-date Chrome Web Browser, and access to YouTube.

Please review the Michigan Virtual Technology Requirements: https://michiganvirtual.org/about/support/knowledge-base/technical-requirements/.

Instructor Support System: For technical issues within your course, contact the Customer Care Center by email at CustomerCare@mivu.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Instructor Contact Expectations: Students can use email or the private message system within the Student Learning Portal to access highly qualified teachers when they need instructor assistance. Students will also receive feedback on their work inside the learning management system. The Instructor Info area of their course may describe additional communication options.

Academic Support Available: In addition to access to a highly qualified, Michigan certified teacher, students have access to academic videos and outside resources verified by Michigan Virtual. For technical issues within the course, students can contact the Michigan Virtual Customer Care by email at customercare@michiganvirtual.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Required Assessment: Online assessments consist of formative and summative assessments represented by computer-graded multiple choice, instructor-graded writing assignments including hands-on projects, model building and other forms of authentic assessments.

Technical Skills Needed: Students should have a working knowledge of HTML and CSS prior to taking this course.  Completion of Basic Web Design: HTML & CSS.  Students will also benefit from having previously completed an introductory computer science or programming course, such as Foundations of Programming or Intro to Java.

Additional Information: Be sure to review the Prerequisite, Technical Skills, and Technical Requirements fields in the syllabus.

Course Name

Algebra 1A

Subject Mathematics
Grade Level High School

Description

This course is the first in a two-course sequence. In the course, students will learn about algebraic concepts such as integers, linear equations, inequalities and factoring. As students work through each interactive lesson, they will have the opportunity to complete several self-check activities and journal entries. Ultimately, this course will assist students in developing fundamental algebraic skills that will allow them to use problem-solving strategies in real-world situations as well as using graphing technology to interpret, represent and communicate mathematical concepts. Prerequisites: Pre-Algebra or 8th Grade Math. 8th grade or higher reading level.

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: 

Explore the foundations of Algebra using rational numbers, radical numbers, ratios, and integers 

Write, solve, and graph equations, inequalities, functions, linear functions and system of equations 

Apply equations, inequalities, functions, linear functions, and system of equations to real world situations.

Course Outline:

Unit 1 – Introduction to Algebra

Unit 2 – Equations & Inequalities

Unit 3 – Linear Functions

Unit 4 – Systems of Equations and Inequalities

Unit 5 – Bivariate Data

Resources Included: Online lesson instruction and activities, opportunities to engage with a certified, online instructor and classmates, when appropriate, and online assessments to measure student performance of course objectives and readiness for subsequent academic pursuits.

Additional Costs: None

Scoring System: Michigan Virtual does not assign letter grades, grant credit for courses, nor issue diplomas. A final score out of total points earned will be submitted to your school mentor for conversion to their own letter grading system.

Time Commitment: Semester sessions are 18-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1 or more hours per day in the course to be successful. Summer sessions are 10 weeks long: Students must be able to spend a minimum of 2 or more hours per day, or about 90 hours during the summer, for the student to be successful in any course. Trimester sessions are 12-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1.5 or more hours per day in the course to be successful.

Technology Requirements: Students will require a computer device with headphones, a microphone, webcam, up-to-date Chrome Web Browser, and access to YouTube.

Please review the Michigan Virtual Technology Requirements: https://michiganvirtual.org/about/support/knowledge-base/technical-requirements/.

Instructor Support System: For technical issues within your course, contact the Customer Care Center by email at CustomerCare@mivu.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Instructor Contact Expectations: Students can use email or the private message system within the Student Learning Portal to access highly qualified teachers when they need instructor assistance. Students will also receive feedback on their work inside the learning management system. The Instructor Info area of their course may describe additional communication options.

Academic Support Available: In addition to access to a highly qualified, Michigan certified teacher, students have access to academic videos and outside resources verified by Michigan Virtual. For technical issues within the course, students can contact the Michigan Virtual Customer Care by email at customercare@michiganvirtual.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Required Assessment: Online assessments consist of formative and summative assessments represented by computer-graded multiple choice, instructor-graded writing assignments including hands-on projects, model building and other forms of authentic assessments.

Technical Skills Needed: No special skills are required beyond being able to operate a computer and use word processing software.

Additional Information: Students are required to complete a scheduled discussion-based assessment with the instructor before each unit test.

Course Name

Algebra 1A Essentials

Subject Mathematics
Grade Level High School

Description

Whether it’s your saving grace or your worst enemy, there’s no getting around it. Algebra is a part of life. The sooner we accept that, the better. The fact is no matter where you go or what you do, you’ll want a functional relationship with algebra. Its graphing skills are off the charts, and it can simplify your life like no other math can. Sure, it might be a bit radical and irrational from time to time, but it isn’t half bad if you just give it a chance. Who knows? It might even be the start of an unlikely friendship. (You + Algebra = BFFs.) Semester A is all about the essence of algebra: converting numbers to letters. And we’ll do it via interactive readings, tons of examples, problem sets, fun activities… well, the list goes on. Needless to say, we’ve got all the Algebra help (and answers) you’ll ever need. Prerequisites: Students must have previously failed to receive credit in an equivalent course within their resident school environment.

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: 

• Take an in-depth look at numbers, units, and how we can logically apply them to real life

• Convert between radicals and exponents, and interpret expressions accordingly. expand, factor, and combine       

   polynomials of all shapes and sizes

• Derive the quadratic formula so that we can create and solve any one-variable equations thrown our way 

• Write linear, quadratic, and exponential functions based on two-variable equations and sequences, and interpret   

   them in context

Course Outline:

Unit 1: Real Numbers and Quantities (13 lessons, 115 points, 14 hours)

Unit 2: Radicals, Exponents, and Expressions (14 lessons, 145 points, 15 hours) 

Unit 3: Polynomials (17 lessons, 160 points, 18 hours)

Unit 4: One-Variable Equations and Inequalities (18 lessons, 165 points, 19 hours) 

Unit 5: Two-Variables Equations and Functions (18 lessons, 140 points, 19 hours)

Resources Included: The credit recovery course is accompanied by student access to Michigan Virtual’s EdReady developmental math program for overall diagnostic assessment of the student’s readiness to successfully complete credit recovery of grade level standards, a customized learning plan for additional support for below grade level skills as well as supplemental practice opportunities related to topics covered in the credit recovery course.  Online lesson instruction and activities, opportunities to engage with a certified, online instructor and classmates, when appropriate, and online assessments to measure student performance of course objectives and readiness for subsequent academic pursuits.

Additional Costs: None

Scoring System: Michigan Virtual does not assign letter grades, grant credit for courses, nor issue diplomas. A final score out of total points earned will be submitted to your school mentor for conversion to their own letter grading system.

Time Commitment: Semester sessions are 18-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1 or more hours per day in the course to be successful. Summer sessions are 10 weeks long: Students must be able to spend a minimum of 2 or more hours per day, or about 90 hours during the summer, for the student to be successful in any course. Trimester sessions are 12-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1.5 or more hours per day in the course to be successful.

Technology Requirements: Students will require a computer device with headphones, a microphone, webcam, up-to-date Chrome Web Browser, and access to YouTube.

Please review the Michigan Virtual Technology Requirements: https://michiganvirtual.org/about/support/knowledge-base/technical-requirements/.

Instructor Support System: For technical issues within your course, contact the Customer Care Center by email at CustomerCare@mivu.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Instructor Contact Expectations: Students can use email or the private message system within the Student Learning Portal to access highly qualified teachers when they need instructor assistance. Students will also receive feedback on their work inside the learning management system. The Instructor Info area of their course may describe additional communication options.

Academic Support Available: In addition to access to a highly qualified, Michigan certified teacher, students have access to academic videos and outside resources verified by Michigan Virtual. For technical issues within the course, students can contact the Michigan Virtual Customer Care by email at customercare@michiganvirtual.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Required Assessment: Online assessments consist of formative and summative assessments represented by computer-graded multiple choice, instructor-graded writing assignments including hands-on projects, model building and other forms of authentic assessments.

Technical Skills Needed: No special skills are required beyond being able to operate a computer and use word processing software.

Additional Information: Every student is required to have a unique email address in order to access the course content.This course permit students to test out of content therefore are not NCAA eligible. If you are enrolling a student athlete for Credit Recovery purposes we recommend our full length plus courses.

Course Name

Algebra 1B

Subject Mathematics
Grade Level High School

Description

This course is the second in a two-course sequence. In the course, students will learn about algebraic concepts such as integers, linear equations, inequalities and factoring. As students work through each interactive lesson, they will have the opportunity to complete several self-check activities and journal entries. Ultimately, this course will assist students in developing fundamental algebraic skills that will allow them to use problem-solving strategies in real-world situations as well as using graphing technology to interpret, represent and communicate mathematical concepts. Prerequisites: Algebra 1A

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: 

Use and explore exponents, polynomials, quadratic functions, exponential functions, radical functions. 

Use and explore quadratic functions and equations. 

Write and use exponential functions.

Course Outline:

Unit 6: Exponents & Polynomials

Unit 7: Factoring Polynomials

Unit 8: Quadratic Functions & Equations

Unit 9: Exponential Functions

Resources Included: Online lesson instruction and activities, opportunities to engage with a certified, online instructor and classmates, when appropriate, and online assessments to measure student performance of course objectives and readiness for subsequent academic pursuits.

Additional Costs: None

Scoring System: Michigan Virtual does not assign letter grades, grant credit for courses, nor issue diplomas. A final score out of total points earned will be submitted to your school mentor for conversion to their own letter grading system.

Time Commitment: Semester sessions are 18-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1 or more hours per day in the course to be successful. Summer sessions are 10 weeks long: Students must be able to spend a minimum of 2 or more hours per day, or about 90 hours during the summer, for the student to be successful in any course. Trimester sessions are 12-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1.5 or more hours per day in the course to be successful.

Technology Requirements: Students will require a computer device with headphones, a microphone, webcam, up-to-date Chrome Web Browser, and access to YouTube.

Please review the Michigan Virtual Technology Requirements: https://michiganvirtual.org/about/support/knowledge-base/technical-requirements/.

Instructor Support System: For technical issues within your course, contact the Customer Care Center by email at CustomerCare@mivu.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Instructor Contact Expectations: Students can use email or the private message system within the Student Learning Portal to access highly qualified teachers when they need instructor assistance. Students will also receive feedback on their work inside the learning management system. The Instructor Info area of their course may describe additional communication options.

Academic Support Available: In addition to access to a highly qualified, Michigan certified teacher, students have access to academic videos and outside resources verified by Michigan Virtual. For technical issues within the course, students can contact the Michigan Virtual Customer Care by email at customercare@michiganvirtual.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Required Assessment: Online assessments consist of formative and summative assessments represented by computer-graded multiple choice, instructor-graded writing assignments including hands-on projects, model building and other forms of authentic assessments.

Technical Skills Needed: No special skills are required beyond being able to operate a computer and use word processing software.

Additional Information: Students are required to complete a scheduled discussion-based assessment with the instructor before each unit test.

Course Name

Algebra 1B Essentials

Subject Mathematics
Grade Level High School

Description

It doesn’t matter whether you love it or hate it. The fact remains that Algebra is around, and by golly, it’s here to stay. What’s not to love about it, though? We’ll admit that it might get a bit irrational from time to time, and there’s no denying a few of its radical tendencies, but it can simplify your life in more ways than the square root of one. Besides, its graphing skills are off the charts. Why not give it a chance? Take it from us: there’s a high probability of it working out.Get ready for interactive readings, activities, and problem sets galore. Prerequisites: Students must have previously failed to receive credit in an equivalent course within their resident school environment.

Course Objectives:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

• Graph all kinds of equations and inequalities 

• Revisit the slope of a line, and see it as the rate of change of a function 

• Solve and graph systems of equations 

• Use probability and statistics.

Course Outline:

Unit 6: Graphing Equations and Inequalities (18 lessons, 165 points, 19 hours)

Unit 7: Graphing Nonlinear Functions (24 lessons, 195 points, 25 hours)

Unit 8: Rate of Change (10 lessons, 150 points, 11 hours)

Unit 9: Systems of Equations and Inequalities (13 lessons, 130 points, 14 hours)

Unit 10: Statistics (15 lessons, 150 points, 16 hours)

Resources Included: The credit recovery course is accompanied by student access to Michigan Virtual’s EdReady developmental math program for overall diagnostic assessment of the student’s readiness to successfully complete credit recovery of grade level standards, a customized learning plan for additional support for below grade level skills as well as supplemental practice opportunities related to topics covered in the credit recovery course.  Online lesson instruction and activities, opportunities to engage with a certified, online instructor and classmates, when appropriate, and online assessments to measure student performance of course objectives and readiness for subsequent academic pursuits.

Additional Costs: N/A

Scoring System: Michigan Virtual does not assign letter grades, grant credit for courses, nor issue diplomas. A final score out of total points earned will be submitted to your school mentor for conversion to their own letter grading system.

Time Commitment: Semester sessions are 18-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1 or more hours per day in the course to be successful. Summer sessions are 10 weeks long: Students must be able to spend a minimum of 2 or more hours per day, or about 90 hours during the summer, for the student to be successful in any course. Trimester sessions are 12-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1.5 or more hours per day in the course to be successful.

Technology Requirements: Students will require a computer device with headphones, a microphone, webcam, up-to-date Chrome Web Browser, and access to YouTube.

Please review the Michigan Virtual Technology Requirements: https://michiganvirtual.org/about/support/knowledge-base/technical-requirements/.

Instructor Support System: For technical issues within your course, contact the Customer Care Center by email at CustomerCare@mivu.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Instructor Contact Expectations: Students can use email or the private message system within the Student Learning Portal to access highly qualified teachers when they need instructor assistance. Students will also receive feedback on their work inside the learning management system. The Instructor Info area of their course may describe additional communication options.

Academic Support Available: In addition to access to a highly qualified, Michigan certified teacher, students have access to academic videos and outside resources verified by Michigan Virtual. For technical issues within the course, students can contact the Michigan Virtual Customer Care by email at customercare@michiganvirtual.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Required Assessment: Online assessments consist of formative and summative assessments represented by computer-graded multiple choice, instructor-graded writing assignments including hands-on projects, model building and other forms of authentic assessments.

Technical Skills Needed: No special skills are required beyond being able to operate a computer and use word processing software.

Additional Information: Every student is required to have a unique email address in order to access the course content. This course permit students to test out of content therefore are not NCAA eligible. If you are enrolling a student athlete for Credit Recovery purposes we recommend our full length plus courses.

Course Name

Algebra 2A

Subject Mathematics
Grade Level High School

Description

This course is the first semester of a full year of Algebra 2. This CCSS-aligned course further develops students’ understanding of algebraic functions and their applications. A major theme is the generalization of concepts and techniques from Algebra 1 and Geometry. Polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, rational and trigonometric functions are studied, and basic properties of complex numbers are introduced. Algebra 2A is the first semester in a two-semester course. In this semester, students will cover functions and polynomials, equations and inequalities, factoring and quadratics, conic sections, and radical and complex numbers. Prerequisites: Algebra 1

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
• Explain and apply mathematical concepts and interpret and carry out mathematical procedures with precision and fluency

• Solve a range of complex well-posed problems in pure and applied mathematics, making productive use of knowledge and problem solving strategies 

• Clearly and precisely construct viable arguments to support their own reasoning and to critique the reasoning of others. 

• Analyze complex, real-world scenarios and can construct and use mathematical models to interpret and solve problems.

Course Outline:

Unit 1 Functions and Polynominals

Unit 2 : Systems of Equations and Inequalities

Unit 3: Factoring and Quadratics

Unit 4: Conic Sections

Unit 5: Radical and Complex Numbers

Resources Included: Online lesson instruction and activities, opportunities to engage with a certified, online instructor and classmates, when appropriate, and online assessments to measure student performance of course objectives and readiness for subsequent academic pursuits.

Additional Costs: None

Scoring System: Michigan Virtual does not assign letter grades, grant credit for courses, nor issue diplomas. A final score out of total points earned will be submitted to your school mentor for conversion to their own letter grading system.

Time Commitment: Semester sessions are 18-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1 or more hours per day in the course to be successful. Summer sessions are 10 weeks long: Students must be able to spend a minimum of 2 or more hours per day, or about 90 hours during the summer, for the student to be successful in any course. Trimester sessions are 12-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1.5 or more hours per day in the course to be successful.

Technology Requirements: Students will require a computer device with headphones, a microphone, webcam, up-to-date Chrome Web Browser, and access to YouTube.

Please review the Michigan Virtual Technology Requirements: https://michiganvirtual.org/about/support/knowledge-base/technical-requirements/.

Instructor Support System: For technical issues within your course, contact the Customer Care Center by email at CustomerCare@mivu.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Instructor Contact Expectations: Students can use email or the private message system within the Student Learning Portal to access highly qualified teachers when they need instructor assistance. Students will also receive feedback on their work inside the learning management system. The Instructor Info area of their course may describe additional communication options.

Academic Support Available: In addition to access to a highly qualified, Michigan certified teacher, students have access to academic videos and outside resources verified by Michigan Virtual. For technical issues within the course, students can contact the Michigan Virtual Customer Care by email at customercare@michiganvirtual.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Required Assessment: Online assessments consist of formative and summative assessments represented by computer-graded multiple choice, instructor-graded writing assignments including hands-on projects, model building and other forms of authentic assessments.

Technical Skills Needed: No special skills are required beyond being able to operate a computer and use word processing software.

Additional Information: N/A

Course Name

Algebra 2A Essentials

Subject Mathematics
Grade Level High School

Description

You had so much fun in Algebra that you had to come back for more? Yeah, we don’t blame you. Algebra II has all the expressions and equations you’ve seen before…and then some. You’re sure to see some old familiar friends along the way (we’re looking at you, polynomials), along with a few unfamiliar faces (we’re looking-or at least trying to look at you, imaginary numbers). Semester A starts off with us venturing into the land of the imaginary. (Feel free to extend an invite to your imaginary childhood friend, Maurice.) After getting our bearings, we’ll check out a familiar landmark, our old friends the polynomials. They’ve learned some tricks, though, including shoving themselves under radicals and stacking each other into rational expressions and equations. We’ll finish up the semester by working with more sequences and series than you can shake a finite stick at. Prerequisites: Students must have previously failed to receive credit in an equivalent course within their resident school environment.

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: 

• Work with imaginary and complex numbers; multiply and divide polynomials and rational expressions

• Create linear, quadratic, exponential, radical, and absolute value equations

• Graph and solve nonlinear equations and inequalities

• Use formulas for arithmetic and geometric sequences and series.

Course Outline:

Unit 1: Number Systems (11 lessons, 180 points, 12 hours)

Unit 2: Introduction to Polynomials (18 lessons, 155 points, 19 hours)

Unit 3: Polynomial Division and Rational Expressions (14 lessons, 120 points, 15 hours)

Unit 4: Radical and Rational Equations (9 lessons, 115 points, 10 hours)

Unit 5: Polynomial, Rational, and Root Functions (16 lessons, 245 points, 18 hours)

Unit 6: Sequences and Series (7 lessons, 75 points, 9 hours)

Resources Included: The credit recovery course is accompanied by student access to Michigan Virtual’s EdReady developmental math program for overall diagnostic assessment of the student’s readiness to successfully complete credit recovery of grade level standards, a customized learning plan for additional support for below grade level skills as well as supplemental practice opportunities related to topics covered in the credit recovery course.  Online lesson instruction and activities, opportunities to engage with a certified, online instructor and classmates, when appropriate, and online assessments to measure student performance of course objectives and readiness for subsequent academic pursuits.

Additional Costs: None

Scoring System: Michigan Virtual does not assign letter grades, grant credit for courses, nor issue diplomas. A final score out of total points earned will be submitted to your school mentor for conversion to their own letter grading system.

Time Commitment: Semester sessions are 18-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1 or more hours per day in the course to be successful. Summer sessions are 10 weeks long: Students must be able to spend a minimum of 2 or more hours per day, or about 90 hours during the summer, for the student to be successful in any course. Trimester sessions are 12-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1.5 or more hours per day in the course to be successful.

Technology Requirements: Students will require a computer device with headphones, a microphone, webcam, up-to-date Chrome Web Browser, and access to YouTube.

Please review the Michigan Virtual Technology Requirements: https://michiganvirtual.org/about/support/knowledge-base/technical-requirements/.

Instructor Support System: For technical issues within your course, contact the Customer Care Center by email at CustomerCare@mivu.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Instructor Contact Expectations: Students can use email or the private message system within the Student Learning Portal to access highly qualified teachers when they need instructor assistance. Students will also receive feedback on their work inside the learning management system. The Instructor Info area of their course may describe additional communication options.

Academic Support Available: In addition to access to a highly qualified, Michigan certified teacher, students have access to academic videos and outside resources verified by Michigan Virtual. For technical issues within the course, students can contact the Michigan Virtual Customer Care by email at customercare@michiganvirtual.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Required Assessment: Online assessments consist of formative and summative assessments represented by computer-graded multiple choice, instructor-graded writing assignments including hands-on projects, model building and other forms of authentic assessments.

Technical Skills Needed: No special skills are required beyond being able to operate a computer and use word processing software.

Additional Information: Every student is required to have a unique email address in order to access the course content. This course permit students to test out of content therefore are not NCAA eligible. If you are enrolling a student athlete for Credit Recovery purposes we recommend our full length plus courses.

Course Name

Algebra 2B

Subject Mathematics
Grade Level High School

Description

This CCSS-aligned course further develops students’ understanding of algebraic functions and their applications. A major theme is the generalization of concepts and techniques from Algebra 1 and Geometry. Polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, rational and trigonometric functions are studied, and basic properties of complex numbers are introduced. Algebra 2B is the second semester in a two-semester course. In this semester, students will cover dividing and solving polynomials, rational expressions, exponential and logarithmic functions, sequences and series, and trigonometric functions, and probability and statistics. Prerequisites: Algebra 2A

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to…

Students will be able to explain and apply mathematical concepts and interpret and carry out mathematical procedures with precision and fluency.

Students will be able to solve a range of complex well-posed problems in pure and applied mathematics, making productive use of knowledge and problem solving strategies.

Students will be able to clearly and precisely construct viable arguments to support their own reasoning and to critique the reasoning of others.

Students will be able to analyze complex, real-world scenarios and can construct and use mathematical models to interpret and solve problems.

Course Outline:

Unit 6: Dividing and Solving Polynomials

Unit 7: Rational Expressions

Unit 8: Exponential and Logarithmic Functions

Unit 9: Sequences and Series

Unit 10: Trigonometric Functions

Unit 11: Probability and Statistics

Resources Included: Online lesson instruction and activities, opportunities to engage with a certified, online instructor and classmates, when appropriate, and online assessments to measure student performance of course objectives and readiness for subsequent academic pursuits.

Additional Costs: None.

Scoring System: Michigan Virtual does not assign letter grades, grant credit for courses, nor issue diplomas. A final score out of total points earned will be submitted to your school mentor for conversion to their own letter grading system.

Time Commitment: Semester sessions are 18-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1 or more hours per day in the course to be successful. Summer sessions are 10 weeks long: Students must be able to spend a minimum of 2 or more hours per day, or about 90 hours during the summer, for the student to be successful in any course. Trimester sessions are 12-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1.5 or more hours per day in the course to be successful.

Technology Requirements: Students will require a computer device with headphones, a microphone, webcam, up-to-date Chrome Web Browser, and access to YouTube.

Please review the Michigan Virtual Technology Requirements: https://michiganvirtual.org/about/support/knowledge-base/technical-requirements/ 

Instructor Support System: For technical issues within your course, contact the Customer Care Center by email at CustomerCare@mivu.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Instructor Contact Expectations: Students can use email or the private message system within the Student Learning Portal to access highly qualified teachers when they need instructor assistance. Students will also receive feedback on their work inside the learning management system. The Instructor Info area of their course may describe additional communication options.

Academic Support Available: In addition to access to a highly qualified, Michigan certified teacher, students have access to academic videos and outside resources verified by Michigan Virtual. For technical issues within the course, students can contact the Michigan Virtual Customer Care by email at customercare@michiganvirtual.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Required Assessment: Online assessments consist of formative and summative assessments represented by computer-graded multiple choice, instructor-graded writing assignments including hands-on projects, model building and other forms of authentic assessments.

Technical Skills Needed: No special skills are required beyond being able to operate a computer and use word processing software.

Additional Information: None

Course Name

Algebra 2B Essentials

Subject Mathematics
Grade Level High School

Description

Yeah, that’s right. Algebra’s back for round two-and this time, it means business. It’s beefed up its stock of algebraic weapons-from sequences and series to trig functions-so it’s going to take a whole lot more than the quadratic formula to get this guy to cry uncle. Good thing you’ve got Shmoop on your side. (And it doesn’t hurt that you’ve been pumping a bit of iron yourself.) Semester B is all about building, analyzing, and interpreting functions of all kinds. Once we’ve learned about exponential functions, logarithms, and trigonometry, we’ll delve deep into functions and their inverses (a.k.a. evil twins). Then we’ll get to know the end behavior of all kinds of functions and describe it using numbers, words, and interpretive dance. Finally, we’ll end the semester with statistics and probability. Prerequisites: Students must have previously failed to receive credit in an equivalent course within their resident school environment.

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: 

• Graph, analyze, and interpret different types of functions

• Build and model with functions

• Use exponential, logarithm, and trigonometric functions

• Understand the normal distribution and real-world applications of statistics

• Use combinations, permutations, and probability

Course Outline:

Unit 7: Exponential and Logarithmic Functions (17 lessons, 200 points, 19 hours)

Unit 8: Trigonometric Functions (13 lessons, 130 points, 16 hours)

Unit 9: Building Functions (12 lessons, 115 points, 13 hours)

Unit 10: Statistics (18 lessons, 225 points, 22 hours)

Unit 11: Probability (14 lessons, 180 points, 16 hours)

Resources Included: The credit recovery course is accompanied by student access to Michigan Virtual’s EdReady developmental math program for overall diagnostic assessment of the student’s readiness to successfully complete credit recovery of grade level standards, a customized learning plan for additional support for below grade level skills as well as supplemental practice opportunities related to topics covered in the credit recovery course.  Online lesson instruction and activities, opportunities to engage with a certified, online instructor and classmates, when appropriate, and online assessments to measure student performance of course objectives and readiness for subsequent academic pursuits.

Additional Costs: None

Scoring System: Michigan Virtual does not assign letter grades, grant credit for courses, nor issue diplomas. A final score out of total points earned will be submitted to your school mentor for conversion to their own letter grading system.

Time Commitment: Semester sessions are 18-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1 or more hours per day in the course to be successful. Summer sessions are 10 weeks long: Students must be able to spend a minimum of 2 or more hours per day, or about 90 hours during the summer, for the student to be successful in any course. Trimester sessions are 12-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1.5 or more hours per day in the course to be successful.

Technology Requirements: Students will require a computer device with headphones, a microphone, webcam, up-to-date Chrome Web Browser, and access to YouTube.

Please review the Michigan Virtual Technology Requirements: https://michiganvirtual.org/about/support/knowledge-base/technical-requirements/ 

Instructor Support System: For technical issues within your course, contact the Customer Care Center by email at CustomerCare@mivu.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Instructor Contact Expectations: Students can use email or the private message system within the Student Learning Portal to access highly qualified teachers when they need instructor assistance. Students will also receive feedback on their work inside the learning management system. The Instructor Info area of their course may describe additional communication options.

Academic Support Available: In addition to access to a highly qualified, Michigan certified teacher, students have access to academic videos and outside resources verified by Michigan Virtual. For technical issues within the course, students can contact the Michigan Virtual Customer Care by email at customercare@michiganvirtual.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Required Assessment: Online assessments consist of formative and summative assessments represented by computer-graded multiple choice, instructor-graded writing assignments including hands-on projects, model building and other forms of authentic assessments.

Technical Skills Needed: No special skills are required beyond being able to operate a computer and use word processing software.

Additional Information: Every student is required to have a unique email address in order to access the course content. This course permit students to test out of content therefore are not NCAA eligible. If you are enrolling a student athlete for Credit Recovery purposes we recommend our full length plus courses.

Course Name

American History A (8th Grade)

Subject Social Studies
Grade Level Middle School

Description

This course is the first in a two-course sequence, and it follows events and trends in U.S. history from the arrival of European explorers through the establishment of a new republic and an expanding nation (beginnings to 1840). You will learn about the earliest Native Americans, Europeans, Africans, Mexicans and others who reshaped life in the Western Hemisphere. You will study who lived in what is known today as the United States; compare the relationship of Native Americans with European explorers and settlers; and examine life in the English Colonies. You will also study the conflict with Great Britain; the establishment of the United States of America, first under the Articles of Confederation, then under the United States Constitution; and look at the challenges that faced an expanding nation. Prerequisites: None

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

• Analyze causes, key events and effects of the Civil War/Reconstruction era.

• Analyze the impact of immigration, the settlement of the American West and industrialization on American society.

• Analyze the changing role of the United States in world affairs at the turn of the twentieth century.

• Evaluate the motivations and impact of American Imperialism on international relations.

• Evaluate the causes and effects of World War I on American politics, economy and society.

Course Outline:

Chapter 1 – The New Nation

Chapter 2 – The Expanding Nation

Chapter 3 – The Civil War

Chapter 4 – Reconstruction and the New South

Chapter 5 – The Western Crossroads

Chapter 6 – The Second Industrial Revolution

Chapter 7 – The Transformation of American Society

Chapter 8 – Politics in the Guilded Age

Chapter 9 – The Age of Reform

Chapter 10 – Progressive Politicians

Chapter 11 – America and the World

Chapter 12 – WWI

Chapter 13 – A Turbulent Decade

Resources Included:  Online lesson instruction and activities, opportunities to engage with a certified, online instructor and classmates, when appropriate, and online assessments to measure student performance of course objectives and readiness for subsequent academic pursuits.

Additional Costs: None

Scoring System: Michigan Virtual does not assign letter grades, grant credit for courses, nor issue diplomas. A final score out of total points earned will be submitted to your school mentor for conversion to their own letter grading system.

Time Commitment: Semester sessions are 18-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1 or more hours per day in the course to be successful. Summer sessions are 10 weeks long: Students must be able to spend a minimum of 2 or more hours per day, or about 90 hours during the summer, for the student to be successful in any course. Trimester sessions are 12-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1.5 or more hours per day in the course to be successful.

Technology Requirements: Students will require a computer device with headphones, a microphone, webcam, up-to-date Chrome Web Browser, and access to YouTube.

Please review the Michigan Virtual Technology Requirements: https://michiganvirtual.org/about/support/knowledge-base/technical-requirements/

Instructor Support System: For technical issues within your course, contact the Customer Care Center by email at CustomerCare@mivu.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Instructor Contact Expectations: Students can use email or the private message system within the Student Learning Portal to access highly qualified teachers when they need instructor assistance. Students will also receive feedback on their work inside the learning management system. The Instructor Info area of their course may describe additional communication options.

Academic Support Available: In addition to access to a highly qualified, Michigan certified teacher, students have access to academic videos and outside resources verified by Michigan Virtual. For technical issues within the course, students can contact the Michigan Virtual Customer Care by email at customercare@michiganvirtual.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Required Assessment: Online assessments consist of formative and summative assessments represented by computer-graded multiple choice, instructor-graded writing assignments including hands-on projects, model building and other forms of authentic assessments.

Technical Skills Needed: No special skills are required beyond being able to operate a computer and use word processing software.

Additional Information: N/A

Course Name

American History B (8th Grade)

Subject Social Studies
Grade Level Middle School

Description

This course is the second in a two-course sequence. American History B continues where American History A leaves off (1840-1890) and leads students to discover industrial growth in the north and agricultural changes in the south along with the new movements in America that included immigrants, women and abolitionists. Students will learn about the expanding west and the rush to find gold. They will investigate how slavery divided the North and the South and eventually contributed to the Civil War along with its casualties and long-term effects on the United States. Students explore the enormous job of Reconstruction and the rebuilding of the nation after the war. Finally, an Epilogue on Modern America will review major events in American History to the present day. Prerequisites: American History A – 8th Grade

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

• Describe the social, cultural, economic and technological ideas and events in the United States in the era between the World Wars.

• Analyze the Great Depression, the Dust Bowl and the New Deal economic policies.

• Analyze the major causes, events and effects of United States’ involvement in World War II.

• Analyze the foreign and domestic policies of the United States since World War II.

• Identify the origins of the Cold War and its foreign and domestic consequences, including confrontations with the Soviet Union.

• Describe the fear of communist influence within the United States including the McCarthy hearings.

• Evaluate the causes and long-term foreign and domestic consequences of United States’ military commitments in Southeast Asia, including the Vietnam War.

Course Outline: Course topics include:

Chapter 14 – The Jazz Age

Chapter 15 – The Great Depression

Chapter 16 – The New deal

Chapter 17 – The Road to War

Chapter 18 – Americans in WWII

Chapter 19 – The Cold War

Chapter 20 – Society After WWII

Chapter 21 – The New Frontier and Great Society

Chapter 22 – The Civil Rights Movement

Chapter 23 – Struggles for Change

Chapter 24 – War in Vietnem

Chapter 25 – From Nixon to Carter

Chapter 26 – The Republican Revolution

Chapter 27 – Launching the New Millenium

Resources Included: Online lesson instruction and activities, opportunities to engage with a certified, online instructor and classmates, when appropriate, and online assessments to measure student performance of course objectives and readiness for subsequent academic pursuits.

Additional Costs: None

Scoring System: Michigan Virtual does not assign letter grades, grant credit for courses, nor issue diplomas. A final score out of total points earned will be submitted to your school mentor for conversion to their own letter grading system.

Time Commitment: Semester sessions are 18-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1 or more hours per day in the course to be successful. Summer sessions are 10 weeks long: Students must be able to spend a minimum of 2 or more hours per day, or about 90 hours during the summer, for the student to be successful in any course. Trimester sessions are 12-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1.5 or more hours per day in the course to be successful.

Technology Requirements: Students will require a computer device with headphones, a microphone, webcam, up-to-date Chrome Web Browser, and access to YouTube.

Please review the Michigan Virtual Technology Requirements: https://michiganvirtual.org/about/support/knowledge-base/technical-requirements/ 

Instructor Support System: For technical issues within your course, contact the Customer Care Center by email at CustomerCare@mivu.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Instructor Contact Expectations: Students can use email or the private message system within the Student Learning Portal to access highly qualified teachers when they need instructor assistance. Students will also receive feedback on their work inside the learning management system. The Instructor Info area of their course may describe additional communication options.

Academic Support Available: In addition to access to a highly qualified, Michigan certified teacher, students have access to academic videos and outside resources verified by Michigan Virtual. For technical issues within the course, students can contact the Michigan Virtual Customer Care by email at customercare@michiganvirtual.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Required Assessment: Online assessments consist of formative and summative assessments represented by computer-graded multiple choice, instructor-graded writing assignments including hands-on projects, model building and other forms of authentic assessments.

Technical Skills Needed: No special skills are required beyond being able to operate a computer and use word processing software.

Additional Information: N/A

Course Name

American Literature A – English 11-12

Subject English Language Arts
Grade Level High School

Description

This is the first course in a two-course sequence. Two major themes for this course are “Leadership at Home” and “Leadership in Society.” Students will address several essential questions related to these themes while reading a variety of works by American authors. In addition to major works, students will read short stories and informational texts, engage in poetry analysis, view informational videos, and write for various purposes. Larger writing assignments include an informative essay and a major research project. Students partake in grammar challenges where they learn about grammar concepts and develop a mastery of their use. In addition to building their writing skills, students learn several reading strategies such as how to use graphic organizers to extract important information, take Cornell notes for an informational text or during a lecture, and summarize to monitor comprehension. Furthermore, students will explore several rhetorical devices and strategies like symbolism, dialect, author’s purpose, foreshadowing, persuasive devices, setting and more. Prerequisites: 10th or 11th Grade English

Course Objectives:

Unit 1:

• Students will be able to identify leaders from their home life and what they have learned from them.

• Students will be able to recognize the traits of good leadership.

• Student will be able to use graphic organizers to write analytical paragraphs.

• Students will be able to conduct and gather research using both primary and secondary sources.

• Students will be able to create a works cited page and parenthetical documentations using MLA format.

• Students will be able to understand, identify, and evaluate the effectiveness of several literary and rhetorical devices like symbolism, author’s purpose, characterization, setting, dialect, and imagery.

• Students will be able to understand Erikson’s Eight Stages of Development and apply what they learned to the lives of characters as well as their own lives.

• Students will be able to apply what they discovered about leadership to themselves and evaluate their current leadership skills.

Unit 2:

• Students will be able to understand what makes an Internet source credible as well as be able to recognize credible sources.

• Students will be able to understand the importance of prior knowledge and preliminary research.

• Students will understand and complete all stages of the research process.

• Student will be able to understand, identify, and evaluate the effectiveness of several literary and rhetorical devices like symbolism, author’s purpose, characterization, setting, dialect, and imagery among others.

• Students will be able to understand rhetorical devices that are used for persuasion and evaluate their effectiveness.

• Students will be able to evaluate the effectiveness of several characters and real people as leaders.

• Students will be able to understand the concept of propaganda and identify several real-world examples of it and explain why an individual would use it.

• Students will be able to use graphic organizers to guide them through readings and help them to think critically about literary and informational texts.

Course Outline: Course Units and Major Topics:

Unit 1: Leadership at Home

• Leadership and Parents

• Leadership at Home Discussion Board

• Analyzing Characteristics of Good Parents and “The Veldt” Graphic Organizer

• Quotation Sandwich Paragraph for “The Veldt”

• Indirect Characterization and “Girl” Discussion

• Leadership and Spirituality

• “Puritans and their Legacy”

• Rhyme Scheme and “Upon the Burning of Our House”

• Metaphors and “Upon the Building of Our House”

• Literary Devices and “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God”

• Leadership and Family

• America’s Best Leaders

• A Raisin in the Sun

• Leadership in A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry

• Characterization

• Symbolism

• Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston

• Setting and Dialect

• Erikson’s Stage of Development

• Informative Essay

Unit 2: Leadership in Society

• Introduction to Research

• Locating Credible Sources

• 60 Minutes and Research Questions

• Choosing a Topic

• Developing Your Own Research Questions

• Bibliography Cards

• Constructing an Annotated Bibliography

• Constructing a Thesis Statement

• What Defines a Good World Leader?

• Desirable Qualities in a Leader DB

• Rhetorical Strategies in “Ain’t I A Woman?”

• Persuasive Rhetoric in Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address

• Comparison and Contrast Chart: Murrow vs. McCarthy

• What Can I do to Avoid Making the Mistakes Made in History?

• Author’s Purpose–The Crucible

• Importance of Preliminary Research–The Salem Witch Trials

• Act I-The Crucible

• Foreshadowing–Act I of The Crucible

• Act II- The Crucible

• Propaganda Techniques

• Propaganda and Act II of The Crucible

• Writing an Introduction–Act II of The Crucible

• Creating an Introduction to Your Research Project

• Who is in a Position to Help Me Affect Change?

• Act III-The Crucible

• Types of Irony–The Crucible Act III

• Irony in Act III of The Crucible

• Act IV-The Crucible

• Theme and Author’s Purpose-The Crucible Act IV

• Completing Note Cards

• Developing the Outline

• Completing the Research Project

Resources Included:  Online lesson instruction and activities, opportunities to engage with a certified, online instructor and classmates, when appropriate, and online assessments to measure student performance of course objectives and readiness for subsequent academic pursuits.

Students will be responsible for locating a print or online version of the following books:

“A Raisin in the Sun” – Lorraine Hansberry

“Their Eyes Were Watching God” – Zora Neale Hurston

“The Crucible” -Arthur Miller

In addition, students may need to locate some short stories, essays, and poems. There are links to electronic versions of all of these works in the course.

“The Veldt” – Ray Bradbury

“Girl” – Jamaica Kincaid

“Upon the Burning of Our House” – Anne Bradstreet

“Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” – Jonathan Edwards

“Ain’t I A Woman?” – Sojourner Truth

“Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address” – Abraham Lincoln

There are additional links to various informational texts within this course.

Additional Costs: Required texts the student must provide:

“A Raisin in the Sun” – Lorraine Hansberry

“Their Eyes Were Watching God” – Zora Neale Hurston

“The Crucible” – Arthur Miller

Various other shorter works

Scoring System: Michigan Virtual does not assign letter grades, grant credit for courses, nor issue diplomas. A final score out of total points earned will be submitted to your school mentor for conversion to their own letter grading system.

Time Commitment: Semester sessions are 18-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1 or more hours per day in the course to be successful. Summer sessions are 10 weeks long: Students must be able to spend a minimum of 2 or more hours per day, or about 90 hours during the summer, for the student to be successful in any course. Trimester sessions are 12-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1.5 or more hours per day in the course to be successful.

Technology Requirements: Students will require a computer device with headphones, a microphone, webcam, up-to-date Chrome Web Browser, and access to YouTube.

Please review the Michigan Virtual Technology Requirements: https://michiganvirtual.org/about/support/knowledge-base/technical-requirements/

Instructor Support System: For technical issues within your course, contact the Customer Care Center by email at CustomerCare@mivu.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Instructor Contact Expectations: Students can use email or the private message system within the Student Learning Portal to access highly qualified teachers when they need instructor assistance. Students will also receive feedback on their work inside the learning management system. The Instructor Info area of their course may describe additional communication options.

Academic Support Available: In addition to access to a highly qualified, Michigan certified teacher, students have access to academic videos and outside resources verified by Michigan Virtual. For technical issues within the course, students can contact the Michigan Virtual Customer Care by email at customercare@michiganvirtual.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Required Assessment: Online assessments consist of formative and summative assessments represented by computer-graded multiple choice, instructor-graded writing assignments including hands-on projects, model building and other forms of authentic assessments.

Technical Skills Needed: No special skills are required beyond being able to operate a computer and use word processing software.

Additional Information: Required texts the student must provide: A Raisin in the Sun–Lorraine Hansberry Their Eyes Were Watching God—Zora Neale Hurston The Crucible—Arthur Miller Various other shorter works

Course Name

American Literature B – English 11-12

Subject English Language Arts
Grade Level High School

Description

This is the second course in a two-course sequence and has been redesigned to align to the Common Core Standards. Two major themes for this semester are “Becoming My Own Leader” and “Leading Others.” Students will address several essential questions related to these themes while reading a variety of works by American authors. In addition to major works, students will read short stories and informational texts, engage in poetry analysis, view informational videos, and write for various purposes. Larger writing assignments include an argument essay, a narrative essay, and a business email. As a supplement to these assignments, students will partake in grammar challenges where they learn about grammar concepts and develop a mastery of their use. In addition to building their writing skills, students learn several reading strategies such as how to use graphic organizers to extract important information, take Cornell notes for an informational text or during a lecture, and summarize to monitor comprehension. Furthermore, students will explore several rhetorical devices and strategies like characterization, allusion, word choice and diction, setting, symbolism, point of view, and more. Prerequisites: American Literature A

Course Objectives: After completing this course students will be able to:

• identify their current responsibilities and develop plans for managing future responsibilities

• activate prior knowledge and build a personal connection with unfamiliar texts

• use graphic organizers to write a variety of paragraphs understand, identify, and evaluate the effectiveness of several literary and rhetorical devices like characterization and word choice

• use systematic approaches to analyze poetry

• understand temperament types and apply what they learned to the lives of characters as well as their own lives

• conduct and gather research using secondary sources

• develop an effective argument essay with claims and counters claims

• create a works cited page and parenthetical documentations using MLA format

• use graphic organizers, Cornell notes, and summarizing to guide them through readings and help them to think critically about literary and informational texts

• use comparison and contrast for evaluation

• understand, identify, and evaluate the effectiveness of several literary and rhetorical devices like dialogue, symbolism, allusion, and point of view

• evaluate how the passage of time alters perspectives

• understand and identify the elements of a persuasive business email

• construct a persuasive business email

• understand and identify the elements of a narrative essay

• construct an effective narrative essay

Course Outline:

Unit 1: Becoming My Own Leader

• What are My Responsibilities, and How do I Balance Them?

• Alice Walker’s “Everyday Use”

• Characterization

• How Do I Balance My Responsibilities with Who I Am?

• Temperament types

• “Danse Russe”

• Word Choice and Connotation

• How Do I Change My World?

• Krakauer’s Into the Wild

• Romanticism

• Emerson’s “Self-Reliance”

• Thoreau from Walden

• Poetry Analysis

• Longfellow’s “Psalm of Life”

• Mayer’s “Waiting on the World to Change”

• Argument Writing

Unit 2: Leading Others

• What rules or principles do I use for how I treat others?

• Codes of Conduct

• O’Connor’s “A Good Man is Hard to Find”

• Comparison and Contrast

• Dialogue

• How can I use my talents to create new opportunities for myself and others?

• Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs

• F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby

• Symbolism

• Allusion

• How can I effectively articulate my opinions and perspectives?

• T.S. Eliot’s “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock”

• Point of View

• Rhetorical context

• Business writing

• Narrative Writing

Resources Included:  Online lesson instruction and activities, opportunities to engage with a certified, online instructor and classmates, when appropriate, and online assessments to measure student performance of course objectives and readiness for subsequent academic pursuits.

There are links to electronic versions of all of these works in the course. “Everyday Use” by Alice Walker “A Good Man is Hard to Find” by Flannery O’Connor “Self-Reliance” Ralph Waldo Emerson “Where I Lived and What I lived for” from Walden by Henry David Thoreau “Danse Russe” by Williams Carlos Williams “Psalm of Life” by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow “Waiting on the World to Change” by John Mayer “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock by T.S. Eliot.

Additional Costs: Students will be responsible for locating a print or online version of the following books: Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer The Great Gatsby by F.Scott Fitzgerald The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien (links to online versions of this text are provided in the course) In addition, students may need to locate some short stories, essays, and poems.

Scoring System: Michigan Virtual does not assign letter grades, grant credit for courses, nor issue diplomas. A final score out of total points earned will be submitted to your school mentor for conversion to their own letter grading system.

Time Commitment: Semester sessions are 18-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1 or more hours per day in the course to be successful. Summer sessions are 10 weeks long: Students must be able to spend a minimum of 2 or more hours per day, or about 90 hours during the summer, for the student to be successful in any course. Trimester sessions are 12-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1.5 or more hours per day in the course to be successful.

Technology Requirements: Students will require a computer device with headphones, a microphone, webcam, up-to-date Chrome Web Browser, and access to YouTube.

Please review the Michigan Virtual Technology Requirements: https://michiganvirtual.org/about/support/knowledge-base/technical-requirements/

Instructor Support System: For technical issues within your course, contact the Customer Care Center by email at CustomerCare@mivu.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Instructor Contact Expectations: Students can use email or the private message system within the Student Learning Portal to access highly qualified teachers when they need instructor assistance. Students will also receive feedback on their work inside the learning management system. The Instructor Info area of their course may describe additional communication options.

Academic Support Available: In addition to access to a highly qualified, Michigan certified teacher, students have access to academic videos and outside resources verified by Michigan Virtual. For technical issues within the course, students can contact the Michigan Virtual Customer Care by email at customercare@michiganvirtual.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Required Assessment: Online assessments consist of formative and summative assessments represented by computer-graded multiple choice, instructor-graded writing assignments including hands-on projects, model building and other forms of authentic assessments.

Technical Skills Needed: No special skills are required beyond being able to operate a computer and use word processing software.

Additional Information: Students will be responsible for locating a print or online version of the following books: “Into the Wild” by Jon Krakauer, “The Great Gatsby” by F.Scott Fitzgerald, “The Things They Carried” by Tim O’Brien (links to online versions of this text are provided in the course). In addition, students may need to locate some short stories, essays, and poems.

Course Name

American Sign Language 1A

Subject World Languages
Grade Level High School

Description

This is the first course in a two-course sequence and focuses on everyday communication in American Sign Language for the Deaf. It introduces students to the basic signs, techniques, and cultural knowledge, which will support the students to start signing beginning level conversational ASL. Each lesson is built upon a familiar topic such as family, self and friends so that students will find meaningful connection to the lessons. Students will be asked to use various media tools including online resources, online dictionaries, a web cam, and the web based audio-visual tool VoiceThread to master the content presented in the course. Students will be producing their own signing videos to demonstrate their learning. The goal of this course is to help develop fundamental ASL skills, and to understand Deafness, knowledge, and interest that students will need to advance to the higher levels of ASL courses.

The learning objectives target Mid-Novice-High Level of MI World Language Standards and Benchmarks.

• The school’s computers and network must meet the required technology requirements.

• This is a limited enrollment course.

• ASL is a sign language that is different from Signed Exact English (SEE). Prerequisites: None

Course Objectives: By the end of the course students will be able to:

• Greet appropriately in ASL in everyday situations

• Initiate and maintain a short ASL conversation

• Explain Deaf perspectives and general myths regarding Deaf culture

Course Outline:

Unit 1 Getting Started – Introduction to the course, tools and media

Unit 2 Introduction to ASL – Basics of ASL handshapes, fingerspelling, and Simple Sentence technique

Unit 3 My Family – Simple Yes/No Question and Information Seeking techniques, and family related signs

Unit 4 My Favorite – Introduction to Topic/Comment Sentence technique, and signs to express one’s preferences

Unit 5 Welcome to My Life – Introduction to ASL Directional Verb signs, and signs to express one’s daily activities

Unit 6 My Friends – Importance of Facial Expression, and signs to express one’s invitation, plan-making, and help-offering

Resources Included: Michigan Virtual provides students enrolled in this course a VoiceThread Account, a Lifeprint.com Online Resource.

Online lesson instruction and activities, opportunities to engage with a certified, online instructor and classmates, when appropriate, and online assessments to measure student performance of course objectives and readiness for subsequent academic pursuits.

Additional Costs: None

Scoring System: Michigan Virtual does not assign letter grades, grant credit for courses, nor issue diplomas. A final score out of total points earned will be submitted to your school mentor for conversion to their own letter grading system.

Time Commitment: Semester sessions are 18-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1 or more hours per day in the course to be successful. Summer sessions are 10 weeks long: Students must be able to spend a minimum of 2 or more hours per day, or about 90 hours during the summer, for the student to be successful in any course. Trimester sessions are 12-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1.5 or more hours per day in the course to be successful.

Technology Requirements: Students will require a computer device with headphones, a microphone, webcam, up-to-date Chrome Web Browser, and access to YouTube.

Please review the Michigan Virtual Technology Requirements: https://michiganvirtual.org/about/support/knowledge-base/technical-requirements/ 

Instructor Support System: For technical issues within your course, contact the Customer Care Center by email at CustomerCare@mivu.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Instructor Contact Expectations: Students can use email or the private message system within the Student Learning Portal to access highly qualified teachers when they need instructor assistance. Students will also receive feedback on their work inside the learning management system. The Instructor Info area of their course may describe additional communication options.

Academic Support Available: In addition to access to a highly qualified, Michigan certified teacher, students have access to academic videos and outside resources verified by Michigan Virtual. For technical issues within the course, students can contact the Michigan Virtual Customer Care by email at customercare@michiganvirtual.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Required Assessment: Online assessments consist of formative and summative assessments represented by computer-graded multiple choice, instructor-graded writing assignments including hands-on projects, model building and other forms of authentic assessments.

Technical Skills Needed: No special skills are required beyond being able to operate a computer and use word processing software.

Additional Information: This course requires extensive use of an asynchronous audio-visual communication tool called VoiceThread. There is an Michigan Virtual-specific VoiceThread account that is used for this course and will be assigned to students.Students must not create or use a personal VoiceThread account for this course. Students must have their own unique email address for VoiceThread to function properly. Their email address for their Michigan Virtual account cannot be used by anyone else, including the mentor or parent.

Course Name

American Sign Language 1B

Subject World Languages
Grade Level High School

Description

This course is the second in a two-course sequence. Topics addressed in the course include information about the Deaf culture, communication problems associated with deaf individuals, and the linguistic heritage of the Deaf community and its influence on our own culture. The online text includes many videos that include role-playing conversations as well as vocabulary. There will be live sessions using a web cam during which time students will demonstrate a mastery of general sign vocabulary along with producing their own conversations.

The activities follow the Michigan standards and benchmarks for World Languages, which are designed to enrich the learning experience and guide students toward developing cultural and linguistic fluency.

• The school’s computers and network must meet the required technology requirements.

• This is a limited enrollment course.

• ASL is a sign language that is different from Signed Exact English (SEE). Prerequisites: American Sign Language 1A

Course Objectives: By the end of the course students will be able to:

• Greet appropriately in ASL in everyday situations

• Initiate and maintain a short ASL conversation

• Explain common practices and products in Deaf culture

• Interpret the basic concept of a song that is sang in a language other than ASL

Course Outline: Culture Topics include:

• Danny Delcambre

• Evelyn Glennie

• Howie Seago

• Ken Glickman

• Lauren Gallimore

• Cochlear Implant

• ASL ABC stories

Resources Included: Michigan Virtual provides students enrolled in this course a VoiceThread Account, a Lifeprint.com Online Resource.

Online lesson instruction and activities, opportunities to engage with a certified, online instructor and classmates, when appropriate, and online assessments to measure student performance of course objectives and readiness for subsequent academic pursuits.

Additional Costs: None

Scoring System: Michigan Virtual does not assign letter grades, grant credit for courses, nor issue diplomas. A final score out of total points earned will be submitted to your school mentor for conversion to their own letter grading system.

Time Commitment: Semester sessions are 18-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1 or more hours per day in the course to be successful. Summer sessions are 10 weeks long: Students must be able to spend a minimum of 2 or more hours per day, or about 90 hours during the summer, for the student to be successful in any course. Trimester sessions are 12-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1.5 or more hours per day in the course to be successful.

Technology Requirements: Students will require a computer device with headphones, a microphone, webcam, up-to-date Chrome Web Browser, and access to YouTube.

Please review the Michigan Virtual Technology Requirements: https://michiganvirtual.org/about/support/knowledge-base/technical-requirements/ 

Instructor Support System: For technical issues within your course, contact the Customer Care Center by email at CustomerCare@mivu.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Instructor Contact Expectations: Students can use email or the private message system within the Student Learning Portal to access highly qualified teachers when they need instructor assistance. Students will also receive feedback on their work inside the learning management system. The Instructor Info area of their course may describe additional communication options.

Academic Support Available: In addition to access to a highly qualified, Michigan certified teacher, students have access to academic videos and outside resources verified by Michigan Virtual. For technical issues within the course, students can contact the Michigan Virtual Customer Care by email at customercare@michiganvirtual.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Required Assessment: Online assessments consist of formative and summative assessments represented by computer-graded multiple choice, instructor-graded writing assignments including hands-on projects, model building and other forms of authentic assessments.

Technical Skills Needed: No special skills are required beyond being able to operate a computer and use word processing software.

Additional Information: This course requires extensive use of an asynchronous audio-visual communication tool called VoiceThread. There is an Michigan Virtual-specific VoiceThread account that is used for this course and will be assigned to students. Students must not create or use a personal VoiceThread account for this course. Students must have their own unique email address for VoiceThread to function properly. Their email address for their Michigan Virtual account cannot be used by anyone else, including the mentor or parent.

Course Name

American Sign Language 2A

Subject World Languages
Grade Level High School

Description

This is the first course of the second year ASL courses and must be taken after the successful completion of the first year ASL courses. This course continues to focus on everyday communication in ASL by introducing students to the basic signs, techniques and culture. To help develop receptive skills without relying on lip movements of the signers, the signing videos will be all “voice off.” To develop expressive skills, students will continue to express their thoughts in signs within the given context in the lessons. Through the introduction to some of the higher ASL techniques such as classifiers and indexing, this second year courses is designed to helps students to develop an understanding that ASL is a visual language that delivers one’s ideas and thoughts using more than the individual signs. Students will continue to use various media tools including online resources, online dictionaries, a web cam and the web based audio-visual tool VoiceThread to master the content presented in the course.

With the prerequisites of the first year courses, this course targets Novice-High Level of Michigan World Language Standards and Benchmarks.

• The school’s computers and network must meet the required technology requirements.

• This is a limited enrollment course.

• ASL is a sign language that is different from Signed Exact English (SEE). Prerequisites: ASL 1A and ASL 1B

Course Objectives:

• Greet appropriately in ASL in everyday situations

• Initiate and maintain a short ASL conversation with socially appropriate manners

• Exchange information with more details in everyday situations

• Identify and explain the current social issues, the roles and perspectives of Deaf family members and the roles of local organizations

• Present one’s thoughts and ideas in ASL in a visual presentation

Course Outline:

Unit 1 Getting Started – Introduction to the course, tools and media.

Unit 2 Weather – Various weather signs, temporal adverbs, and comparison techniques.

Unit 3 Health – ASL honorifics, Classifiers, and listing & ordering techniques.

Unit 4 Shopping – ASL numbers 100-999, comparatives & superlatives, attention seeking, and HOW-question techniques.

Unit 5 Family Tradition – ASL pluralization, present & absent referencing, and indexing techniques.

Unit 6 Community – Telling hours & minutes, location of things, frequency, and noun & verb pairs.

Resources Included: Michigan Virtual provides students enrolled in this course a VoiceThread Account, a Lifeprint.com Online Resource.

Online lesson instruction and activities, opportunities to engage with a certified, online instructor and classmates, when appropriate, and online assessments to measure student performance of course objectives and readiness for subsequent academic pursuits.

Additional Costs: None

Scoring System: Michigan Virtual does not assign letter grades, grant credit for courses, nor issue diplomas. A final score out of total points earned will be submitted to your school mentor for conversion to their own letter grading system.

Time Commitment: Semester sessions are 18-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1 or more hours per day in the course to be successful. Summer sessions are 10 weeks long: Students must be able to spend a minimum of 2 or more hours per day, or about 90 hours during the summer, for the student to be successful in any course. Trimester sessions are 12-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1.5 or more hours per day in the course to be successful.

Technology Requirements: Students will require a computer device with headphones, a microphone, webcam, up-to-date Chrome Web Browser, and access to YouTube.

Please review the Michigan Virtual Technology Requirements: https://michiganvirtual.org/about/support/knowledge-base/technical-requirements/ 

Instructor Support System: For technical issues within your course, contact the Customer Care Center by email at CustomerCare@mivu.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Instructor Contact Expectations: Students can use email or the private message system within the Student Learning Portal to access highly qualified teachers when they need instructor assistance. Students will also receive feedback on their work inside the learning management system. The Instructor Info area of their course may describe additional communication options.

Academic Support Available: In addition to access to a highly qualified, Michigan certified teacher, students have access to academic videos and outside resources verified by Michigan Virtual. For technical issues within the course, students can contact the Michigan Virtual Customer Care by email at customercare@michiganvirtual.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Required Assessment: Online assessments consist of formative and summative assessments represented by computer-graded multiple choice, instructor-graded writing assignments including hands-on projects, model building and other forms of authentic assessments.

Technical Skills Needed: No special skills are required beyond being able to operate a computer and use word processing software.

Additional Information: This course requires extensive use of an asynchronous audio-visual communication tool called VoiceThread. There is an Michigan Virtual-specific VoiceThread account that is used for this course and will be assigned to students. Students must not create or use a personal VoiceThread account for this course. Students must have their own unique email address for VoiceThread to function properly. Their email address for their Michigan Virtual account cannot be used by anyone else, including the mentor or parent.

Course Name

American Sign Language 2B

Subject World Languages
Grade Level High School

Description

This is the second course of the second year of ASL courses. The course continues to focus on useful communication that students should be able to carry out in ASL. Students study the basic signs and phrases, techniques, and cultural nature of the language. This course introduces the students to the new concept of conceptually accurate signing that places emphasis on awareness of differences between ASL and English. Lesson topics shift from the everyday interaction in one’s immediate environment to interactions in the community to help students to build signing skills for obtaining and providing information rather than simply exchanging information. To support students build the conceptual accuracy, the lessons stress ASL classifiers; students will be challenged to receptively identify some of the most common classifiers in contexts, and to apply them in their own signing. As a part of culture learning, students will continue to learn more facts about the Deaf culture as well as current and past challenging social issues. The signing videos will be all “voice off” to help develop students’ receptive skills without reading lips. Students will continue to produce their own signing videos to demonstrate their learning. The goal of this course is to help utilize the fundamental ASL skills and knowledge into simple interpersonal and social interactions, and to build confidence needed to advance to the higher levels of ASL courses.

This course targets Novice-High Level of MI World Language Standards and Benchmarks.

• The school’s computers and network must meet the required technology requirements.

• This is a limited enrollment course.

• ASL is a sign language that is different from Signed Exact English (SEE). Prerequisites: ASL 2A

Course Objectives: By the end of the course students will be able to:

• Receive and provide simple information that are represented by ASL classifiers.

• Demonstrate the minimum level of conceptual accuracy by attending to the meaning of frequently used English words.

• Identify and explain the current and past social issues, and make connections to the society as a whole.

Course Outline:

Unit 1 – Getting Started – Introduction to the course, tools and media.

Unit 2 – Community Service – Use of EXPERIENCE FINSH, rule of 9, classifiers review, singular and plural GO-TO, CL: 1, noun-verb pairs, and attending to English homonyms;

Unit 3 – Traveling – Introduction to conceptual accuracy, , introduction to eye gazing, near and distant future/past, CL: 4, CL: V and CL:3;

Unit 4 – Culture Exchange – Alternative ethnicity signs, shoulder-shifting to mean ‘but’ and ‘and’, ASL numbers 1000<, ordinal numbers, individual use of EXPERIENCE and FINISH;

Unit 5 – Family Routine – Spatial organization with shoulder shifting, age spot and numerical incorporation, tense markers, locations of objects, and CL:3;

Unit 6 – Getting Around in Town – Asking for/giving a general direction, asking for/giving a more specific direction, fixing mistakes during a conversation, CL:V and CL: Claw.

Resources Included: Michigan Virtual provides students enrolled in this course a VoiceThread Account, a Lifeprint.com Online Resource.

Online lesson instruction and activities, opportunities to engage with a certified, online instructor and classmates, when appropriate, and online assessments to measure student performance of course objectives and readiness for subsequent academic pursuits.

Additional Costs: None

Scoring System: Michigan Virtual does not assign letter grades, grant credit for courses, nor issue diplomas. A final score out of total points earned will be submitted to your school mentor for conversion to their own letter grading system.

Time Commitment: Semester sessions are 18-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1 or more hours per day in the course to be successful. Summer sessions are 10 weeks long: Students must be able to spend a minimum of 2 or more hours per day, or about 90 hours during the summer, for the student to be successful in any course. Trimester sessions are 12-weeks long: Students must be able to spend 1.5 or more hours per day in the course to be successful.

Technology Requirements: Students will require a computer device with headphones, a microphone, webcam, up-to-date Chrome Web Browser, and access to YouTube.

Please review the Michigan Virtual Technology Requirements: https://michiganvirtual.org/about/support/knowledge-base/technical-requirements/

Instructor Support System: For technical issues within your course, contact the Customer Care Center by email at CustomerCare@mivu.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Instructor Contact Expectations: Students can use email or the private message system within the Student Learning Portal to access highly qualified teachers when they need instructor assistance. Students will also receive feedback on their work inside the learning management system. The Instructor Info area of their course may describe additional communication options.

Academic Support Available: In addition to access to a highly qualified, Michigan certified teacher, students have access to academic videos and outside resources verified by Michigan Virtual. For technical issues within the course, students can contact the Michigan Virtual Customer Care by email at customercare@michiganvirtual.org or by phone at (888) 889-2840.

Required Assessment: Online assessments consist of formative and summative assessments represented by computer-graded multiple choice, instructor-graded writing assignments including hands-on projects, model building and other forms of authentic assessments.

Technical Skills Needed: No special skills are required beyond being able to operate a computer and use word processing software.

Additional Information: This course requires extensive use of an asynchronous audio-visual communication tool called VoiceThread. There is an Michigan Virtual-specific VoiceThread account that is used for this course and will be assigned to students. Students must not create or use a personal VoiceThread account for this course. Students must have their own unique email address for VoiceThread to function properly. Their email address for their Michigan Virtual account cannot be used by anyone else, including the mentor or parent.

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