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This is the first course in a two-semester Accounting course sequence. Accounting is the process of planning, recording, analyzing, and interpreting financial information. The accounting process includes recording financial activities, but accounting is not the same as bookkeeping or recordkeeping. Bookkeeping is only the recording part of the accounting process. Accounting goes much further than just keeping records. Accounting involves analyzing and interpreting a business’s operations to determine its financial well-being and plan its future success. Accounting A is a skills-based course that is of value to all students, whether exploring a career in business or for personal financial needs. Accounting A is an essential course for students who are pursuing a strong background in business, marketing and management. This course covers the complete accounting cycle for a service business organized as a proprietorship, along with journalizing and posting transactions.

This is the second course in a two-semester Accounting course sequence. This course is a continuation of Accounting A. In Accounting B, students will expand their knowledge of accounting procedures by working within the structure of a merchandising business organized as a corporation. Competency will be exhibited in completing payroll taxes and reports, special journals and other financial statements.

COURSE RATIONALE: Students studying business and management related fields must understand accounting, the language of business. This course is a core component of the programs offered by the Business Administration area. ACCT 211 begins the introduction into financial accounting. CATALOG DESCRIPTION: ACCT 211: Principles of Accounting I. This course is designed to begin the study of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and practices used in business. The focus of this course is on Financial Accounting. Students will study the useful application of recording, adjusting, summarizing and reporting financial data significant to the management and control of a business enterprise. Topics studied include accounting for sole proprietorships with the emphasis on service oriented and merchandising firms.

This Advanced Programming: Mobile Apps and Game Design course is a highly project based course designed for high school students with some programming background before attempting this advanced level course. Students taking this course will learn to strategize, design, and develop games, as well as, mobile and desktop applications that can be produced in the real world. Students will learn about life-cycles of project development and use models to develop applications. Attention will be placed on how user interfaces affect the usability and effectiveness of a game or an application. Programming constructs will be employed which will allow students’ applications to interact with “real world,” stimuli. The course also exposes students to privacy, legality, and security considerations with regards to the software industry.

JavaScript is one of the 3 languages all web developers must learn: 1. HTML to define the content of web pages 2. CSS to specify the layout of web pages 3. JavaScript to program the behavior of web pages In this course, students will learn how to start programming with JavaScript. Students will learn the basics of JavaScript including testing, functions, objects, arrays, loops, conditional code, operators and syntax basics. Students will learn timing and animations, and how to debug. The class will conclude with a robust project that incorporates everything they learned in the semester. Students should have a working knowledge of HTML and CSS prior to taking this course.

This course is the first semester of a two-semester sequence and is aligned to the Advanced Placement curriculum for Art History. Students will examine major forms of artistic expression from the past and present and from a variety of cultures and will learn to look at these works of art critically, with intelligence and sensitivity, and to articulate what they see or experience. Schools must supply a proctor for the midterm and final exam. Course does not include the AP Exam; students can contact their school’s AP Coordinator or the College Board to sign up to take the Exam. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

This course is the second semester of a two-semester sequence and is aligned to the Advanced Placement curriculum for Art History. Students will examine major forms of artistic expression from the past and present and from a variety of cultures and will learn to look at these works of art critically, with intelligence and sensitivity, and to articulate what they see or experience. Schools must supply a proctor for the midterm and final exam. Course does not include the AP Exam; students can contact their school’s AP Coordinator or the College Board to sign up to take the Exam. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

This course is the first semester of a two-semester sequence and is aligned to the Advanced Placement curriculum for Computer Science A. AP Computer Science is a college level computer course covering the applications of computing within the context of programming methodology, algorithms, and data structures. The Java computer language which is a free download for either a Macintosh or a Windows platform. This course requires a proctored mid-term and final exam. Course does not include the AP Exam; students can contact their school’s AP Coordinator or the College Board to sign up to take the Exam. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

This course is the second semester of a two-semester sequence and is aligned to the Advanced Placement curriculum for Computer Science A. AP Computer Science is a college level computer course covering the applications of computing within the context of programming methodology, algorithms, and data structures. The Java computer language which is a free download for either a Macintosh or a Windows platform. This course requires a proctored mid-term and final exam. Course does not include the AP Exam; students can contact their school’s AP Coordinator or the College Board to sign up to take the Exam. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

This course covers the central ideas of computer science using visualization and application. Students will learn the ideas and practices of computational thinking with a focus on fostering student creativity. They will develop a range of skills by using computational tools to analyze and study data, work individually and collaboratively to solve problems, and discuss the importance of problems and the impacts to their community, society and the world. This course is designed to be far more than a traditional introduction to programming. It is a rigorous, engaging, and approachable course that explores many of the big, foundational ideas of computing so that all students understand how these concepts are transforming the world we live in. This is the first semester of a year-long course and continues with AP® Computer Science Principles B.

This is the first semester of a full-year, rigorous, entry-level course that introduces high school students to the foundations of modern computing. The course covers a broad range of foundational topics such as programming, algorithms, the Internet, big data, digital privacy and security, and the societal impacts of computing. Computing affects almost all aspects of modern life and all students deserve an education that prepares them to pursue the wide array of opportunities that computing has made possible. This course seeks to provide knowledge and skills to meaningfully participate in our increasingly digital society, economy, and culture.

This course covers the central ideas of computer science using visualization and application. Students will learn the ideas and practices of computational thinking with a focus on fostering student creativity. They will develop a range of programming skills, work individually and collaboratively to solve problems, and explore a number of programming environments. This course is designed to be far more than a traditional introduction to programming. It is a rigorous, engaging, and approachable course that explores many of the big, foundational ideas of computing so that all students understand how these concepts are transforming the world we live in. This is the second semester of a year-long course and continues the concepts and skills covered in AP Computer Science Principles (Sem 1).

This is the second semester of a full-year, rigorous, entry-level course that introduces high school students to the foundations of modern computing. The course covers a broad range of foundational topics such as programming, algorithms, the Internet, big data, digital privacy and security, and the societal impacts of computing. Computing affects almost all aspects of modern life and all students deserve an education that prepares them to pursue the wide array of opportunities that computing has made possible. This course seeks to provide knowledge and skills to meaningfully participate in our increasingly digital society, economy, and culture.

COURSE RATIONALE: Art Appreciation is an introductory course for non-art majors. This course may be used as a humanities credit or as an elective. Students will explore, evaluate and appreciate art using an appropriate arts vocabulary. CATALOG DESCRIPTION: ART 120 Art Appreciation. This course is an introductory course that explores art fundamentals. Design elements, media, historical periods, and art movements are presented to provide the student with a basic visual literacy and appreciation for the arts. This class is for non-art majors.

How to design a beautiful and functional website. Students will learn how to take their design and translate it into a live website using Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) programing languages. HTML5 and CSS3 will be the standard versions used in the class. Students will understand design components of websites, including the use of color, layout and when to use different techniques, typography rules, and the importance of imagery. At the conclusion of the course, students will present a website to the class. Upon completion of this course, each student will have hands-on experience creating a fully functioning website.

COURSE RATIONALE: To introduce students to the American legal system as it applies to business transactions. CATALOG DESCRIPTION: BUS 153: Business Law. This course is a practical approach to law that emphasizes current and relevant topics students need to understand about business transactions and issues, such as contracts, property, employer/employee relations, and insurance.

Sometimes choices between right and wrong are obvious. But what happens when you’re faced with a situation that’s not so clear-cut? In this course, students will learn to anticipate and address ethical dilemmas that come up in a business setting. They will examine how humans have understood ethics over the years and what matters most in the business world today. Students will investigate actual scenarios and apply all they’ve learned to addressing these complicated ethical dilemmas. By the end, students will have developed their ability to work through challenging situations using their own moral imagination. Students will also have a variety of role models, lessons learned from ethical scandals, and ethical skills to draw upon when they face these challenges in real life.

This course provides a basic overview of career planning concepts. It gives students the opportunity to learn about, explore and reflect on various career opportunities based on Michigan’s six Career Pathways.

This course is designed to guide students through the process of exploring and choosing potential career pathways. Students will engage in self-exploration activities such as skills and interests assessments and apply what they learn to the process of choosing a career. Course features include an exploration of post-secondary educational options and requirements, informational interview and job shadowing experiences, as well as problem solving and goal setting activities. This student-centered course focuses on helping students get to know themselves so they can find the future that’s right for them! Instead of a final exam, students will complete an end-of-course project. To complete this project students will use the assignments in each unit to help them begin to develop an Educational Development Plan (EDP). An Educational Development Plan is designed to help students identify their career and educational goals as they relate to academic requirements. An EDP is a way for students to document their progress toward career and educational goals. If students have already started an EDP at their schools, they can use this final project to update it with the most current information about their career and educational goals.

This is the first of a three-course series designed to prepare you for the 200-301 Cisco® Certified Network Associate (CCNA®) exam. Begin preparing for a networking career with this introduction to how networks operate. This includes learning the architecture, structure, and functions needed to support the operations and priorities of Fortune 500 companies to small innovative retailers. You will even get the chance to configure a network yourself, such as a simple LAN (Local Area Network). After completing this course, you will have a working knowledge of routing, switching, network applications and protocols. This course is offered in partnership with the Pinckney Cyber Training Institute.

Limited Course Capacity

We’re sorry to inform you that we have reached capacity for several of our Semester 1 and Trimester 1 courses. You’ll notice when attempting to enroll students in our Student Learning Portal that some courses are unavailable. While we are no longer accepting new enrollments for these courses at this time, many courses continue to remain open for enrollment.

With many students across the state 100% remote, demand for our online courses is greater than ever before. Because every course we offer is taught by a Michigan-certified teacher, this high volume of enrollments has created capacity issues for our teachers who provide each and every student with individual feedback.

While the Michigan Virtual team anticipated and planned for significant increases in student enrollments this Fall, the increased demand we’ve experienced has been unprecedented. As a result, we are taking steps to hire even more part-and full-time teachers to support larger numbers of student enrollments for Semester 2 as well as for Trimester 2 and 3. 

For schools that still need online learning options this year, please fill out the form at the bottom of our virtual pathways page to meet with someone to discuss other solutions. While some of our teacher-led courses are full, we may still have the capacity to help you in upcoming terms or can discuss timing to implement a whole-school or collaborative program in which local teachers from your school/district use our online course content to teach students. We also have free course content and resources available for you to use.

We know this is an incredibly stressful time for all, and we’re sorry if the courses you’re looking for are unavailable. We never want to turn away a student who wants to learn from us. Our top concern, however, is student success, and we have a policy to not take on additional enrollments if we cannot guarantee that all students will have a quality online learning experience. 

We appreciate your patience and understanding as we navigate the unusually high volume of enrollments we are receiving.