Filter By

Subject Area

School Level

Course Term

Course Type

NCAA Approved?

This is the first course in a two-course sequence. Two major themes for this course are “Leadership at Home” and “Leadership in Society.” Students will address several essential questions related to these themes while reading a variety of works by American authors. In addition to major works, students will read short stories and informational texts, engage in poetry analysis, view informational videos, and write for various purposes. Larger writing assignments include an informative essay and a major research project. Students partake in grammar challenges where they learn about grammar concepts and develop a mastery of their use. In addition to building their writing skills, students learn several reading strategies such as how to use graphic organizers to extract important information, take Cornell notes for an informational text or during a lecture, and summarize to monitor comprehension. Furthermore, students will explore several rhetorical devices and strategies like symbolism, dialect, author’s purpose, foreshadowing, persuasive devices, setting and more.

This is the second course in a two-course sequence and has been redesigned to align to the Common Core Standards. Two major themes for this semester are “Becoming My Own Leader” and “Leading Others.” Students will address several essential questions related to these themes while reading a variety of works by American authors. In addition to major works, students will read short stories and informational texts, engage in poetry analysis, view informational videos, and write for various purposes. Larger writing assignments include an argument essay, a narrative essay, and a business email. As a supplement to these assignments, students will partake in grammar challenges where they learn about grammar concepts and develop a mastery of their use. In addition to building their writing skills, students learn several reading strategies such as how to use graphic organizers to extract important information, take Cornell notes for an informational text or during a lecture, and summarize to monitor comprehension. Furthermore, students will explore several rhetorical devices and strategies like characterization, allusion, word choice and diction, setting, symbolism, point of view, and more.

This is the first semester in a two-semester sequence and provides students with college level instruction in studying and writing various kinds of analytic or persuasive essays on literary and nonliterary topics in language, rhetoric and expository writing. Students will become skilled readers of prose written in various periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts. Both their reading and writing should make students aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects as well as the way writing conventions and language contribute to effectiveness in writing. This course will effectively prepare students for the AP Exam by enabling them to read, comprehend, and write about complex texts, while developing further communication skills on a college level. Course does not include the AP Exam; students can contact their school’s AP Coordinator or the College Board to sign up to take the Exam. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

This is the second semester in a two-semester sequence and provides students with college level instruction in studying and writing various kinds of analytic or persuasive essays on literary and nonliterary topics in language, rhetoric and expository writing. Students will become skilled readers of prose written in various periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts. Both their reading and writing should make students aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects as well as the way writing conventions and language contribute to effectiveness in writing. This course will effectively prepare students for the AP Exam by enabling them to read, comprehend, and write about complex texts, while developing further communication skills on a college level. Course does not include the AP Exam; students can contact their school’s AP Coordinator or the College Board to sign up to take the Exam. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

This is the first semester in a two-semester sequence and provides high school students with college-level instruction in active, close reading, and analysis of imaginative literature. Through the close reading of works of literary merit, students learn to consider how a work’s style, figurative language, theme, and other literary elements contribute to its meaning and cultural significance. This approach to analyzing prose and poetry allows students to establish connections, make observations about textual details, and sharpen their understanding of these nuances through their own writing. This course will effectively prepare students for the AP Exam and learning beyond the exam by enabling them to read, analyze, and write about complex texts. Course does not include the AP Exam; students can contact their school’s AP Coordinator or the College Board to sign up to take the Exam. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

This course provides high school students with college-level instruction in active, close reading, and analysis of imaginative literature. Through the close reading of works of literary merit, students learn to consider how a work’s style, figurative language, theme, and other literary elements contribute to its meaning and cultural significance. This approach to analyzing prose and poetry allows students to establish connections, make observations about textual details, and sharpen their understanding of these nuances through their own writing. This course will effectively prepare students for the AP Exam and learning beyond the exam by enabling them to read, analyze, and write about complex texts.

This is the second semester in a two-semester sequence and provides high school students with college-level instruction in active, close reading, and analysis of imaginative literature. Through the close reading of works of literary merit, students learn to consider how a work’s style, figurative language, theme, and other literary elements contribute to its meaning and cultural significance. This approach to analyzing prose and poetry allows students to establish connections, make observations about textual details, and sharpen their understanding of these nuances through their own writing. This course will effectively prepare students for the AP Exam and learning beyond the exam by enabling them to read, analyze, and write about complex texts. Course does not include the AP Exam; students can contact their school’s AP Coordinator or the College Board to sign up to take the Exam. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

This course provides high school students with college-level instruction in active, close reading, and analysis of imaginative literature. Through the close reading of works of literary merit, students learn to consider how a work’s style, figurative language, theme, and other literary elements contribute to its meaning and cultural significance. This approach to analyzing prose and poetry allows students to establish connections, make observations about textual details, and sharpen their understanding of these nuances through their own writing. This course will effectively prepare students for the AP Exam and learning beyond the exam by enabling them to read, analyze, and write about complex texts.

This is the first course in a two-course sequence. In this course students will read engaging works and explore topics of interest as they develop their reading, writing, and speaking skills. Students will use essential questions to focus on a topic for each unit, such as Transformation of Language and Informed Decision Making.

This is the second course in a two-course sequence in British literature. In this course students will read engaging works and explore topics of interest as they develop their reading, writing, and speaking skills. Students will use essential questions to focus on a topic for each unit, such as Technology: Potential for Enhancing Human Life and The DNA for Survival.

This is the second course in a two-course sequence. In this course, students will study and become proficient in the use of the writing process. Students will also learn several grammar concepts that involve sentence structure, punctuation, and usage. In addition, they will learn about essay structure and organization through the development of five common types of essays: process analysis, definition, narrative, comparison/contrast, and classification and division.

This is the first course in a two-course sequence. In this course, students will study and become proficient in the use of the writing process. Students will also learn several grammar concepts that involve sentence structure, punctuation, and usage. In addition, they will learn about essay structure and organization through the development of five common types of essays: process analysis, definition, narrative, comparison/contrast, and classification and division.

During the summer of 2021, we will be offering free access to EdReady Math and EdReady English to Michigan families. Until September 1, 2021, students will be able to access these programs at no cost. For further details, please visit https://michiganvirtual.org/students/edready/ rather than enrolling in the Student Learning Portal (SLP). EdReady English permits students to self-assess for mastery of grade-level knowledge and skills. EdReady uses diagnostic testing to establish personalized study paths to fill in learning gaps and to reinforce understanding. EdReady English for grades 10th-12th contains six goals, each containing between 14 and 29 learning topics (124 learning objectives in total) aimed at fully preparing students for readiness to continue high school academic work toward college English readiness.

During the summer of 2021, we will be offering free access to EdReady Math and EdReady English to Michigan families. Until September 1, 2021, students will be able to access these programs at no cost. For further details, please visit https://michiganvirtual.org/students/edready/ rather than enrolling in the Student Learning Portal (SLP). EdReady English permits students to self-assess for mastery of grade-level knowledge and skills. EdReady uses diagnostic testing to establish personalized study paths to fill in learning gaps and to reinforce understanding. EdReady English for grades 8th-9th contains five goals, each containing between 9 and 26 learning topics (65 learning objectives in total) aimed at fully preparing students for readiness to continue high school academic work toward college English readiness.

COURSE RATIONALE: To have students write effective, coherent, unified, well-developed and supported multi-paragraph expository essays. CATALOG DESCRIPTION: ENG 101 English Composition I. This course includes various types of current prose, a study of English usage and intensive practice in composition, all of which is designed to improve a student’s ability to express ideas in a clear, logical, and forceful manner.

COURSE RATIONALE: 1) To continue the process of developing the student’s writing skills begun in English 101 by emphasizing more advanced skills, e.g., evaluation, analysis, interpretation and synthesis. 2) To complete all steps of the process of a research paper, from finding a subject to locating appropriate resources to taking effective notes from sources to incorporating resource materials (with proper documentation) into a finished research paper of 7-15 pages. CATALOG DESCRIPTION: ENG 102 English Composition II. This course will provide practice in writing extensive units of composition with emphasis on critical thinking skills. Through the study of a variety of texts, students will practice analytical and interpretative writing, including one formal source paper involving training in the use of library facilities and research techniques.

This is the first course in a two-course sequence. Students will read engaging works of literature and explore topics of interest as they develop their reading, writing and speaking skills. Students will complete two sets of units that focus on narrative writing and argumentative writing.

This is the second course in a two-course sequence. In this course students will read engaging works and explore topics of interest as they develop their reading, writing, and speaking skills. Students will use essential questions to focus on a topic for each unit. The course is aligned to the Common Core Standards.

This is the first course in a two-course sequence. As students progress through the course, they will explore two main themes, “Courage” and “Choice”, and address essential questions while reading a variety of works. Students will read novels, short stories and informational texts, engage in poetry analysis, view informational videos and write for various purposes. Larger writing assignments include a research project and a narrative essay. As a supplement to these writing assignments, students will partake in grammar challenges where they learn about grammar concepts and develop a mastery of their use. In addition to building their writing skills, students will learn several reading strategies such as how to use graphic organizers to extract important information and summarize to monitor comprehension. Furthermore, students will explore several rhetorical devices and strategies like symbolism, figurative language, theme, setting and more.

This is the second course in a two-course sequence. The two major themes for this semester are “Survival” and “Discovery.” As students progress through these themes, they will address several essential questions related to these themes while reading a variety of works. In addition to major works, students will read short stories and informational texts, engage in poetry analysis, view informational videos, and write for various purposes. Some of the larger writing assignments include a research project and a narrative essay. As a supplement to these writing assignments, students will partake in grammar challenges where they learn about grammar concepts and develop a mastery of their use. In addition to building their writing skills, students will learn several reading strategies such as how to use graphic organizers to extract important information and summarize to monitor comprehension. Furthermore, students will explore several rhetorical devices and strategies like characterization, allusion, word choice and diction, setting, and more.

Limited Course Capacity

We’re sorry to inform you that we have reached capacity for several of our Semester 1 and Trimester 1 courses. You’ll notice when attempting to enroll students in our Student Learning Portal that some courses are unavailable. While we are no longer accepting new enrollments for these courses at this time, many courses continue to remain open for enrollment.

With many students across the state 100% remote, demand for our online courses is greater than ever before. Because every course we offer is taught by a Michigan-certified teacher, this high volume of enrollments has created capacity issues for our teachers who provide each and every student with individual feedback.

While the Michigan Virtual team anticipated and planned for significant increases in student enrollments this Fall, the increased demand we’ve experienced has been unprecedented. As a result, we are taking steps to hire even more part-and full-time teachers to support larger numbers of student enrollments for Semester 2 as well as for Trimester 2 and 3. 

For schools that still need online learning options this year, please fill out the form at the bottom of our virtual pathways page to meet with someone to discuss other solutions. While some of our teacher-led courses are full, we may still have the capacity to help you in upcoming terms or can discuss timing to implement a whole-school or collaborative program in which local teachers from your school/district use our online course content to teach students. We also have free course content and resources available for you to use.

We know this is an incredibly stressful time for all, and we’re sorry if the courses you’re looking for are unavailable. We never want to turn away a student who wants to learn from us. Our top concern, however, is student success, and we have a policy to not take on additional enrollments if we cannot guarantee that all students will have a quality online learning experience. 

We appreciate your patience and understanding as we navigate the unusually high volume of enrollments we are receiving.