Subject Area

School Level

Course Term

NCAA Approved

Course Type

AP U.S. History (Sem 2)

Subject Social Studies
Grade Level High School

Description

Advanced Placement U.S. History II is a college-level introductory course which examines the nation’s political, diplomatic, intellectual, cultural, social, and economic history from 1865 to Present. This course will continue the study of American history that was begun in Advanced Placement US History I. Students are challenged to see American history through a variety of historical themes while developing thinking skills that will help them to contextualize specific periods of American history. A college level textbook is supplemented by primary and secondary sources throughout this course. This course does not include the AP exam; students can contact their school’s AP coordinator or guidance counselor to sign up for the exam. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

Middle School U.S. History A

Subject Social Studies
Grade Level Middle School

Description

This is the first segment of a year-long course. In this course, students will explore the history of the United States and analyze the cause and effect in historical events. They will investigate history by using the tools of a historian to examine the historical, geographic, political, economic, and sociological events that influenced the development of the United States. Students will imagine what it was like to live in the past by reading the stories from the people who experienced it. This course begins with the engaging stories of what brought the earliest American colonists to the New World and ends with the struggles to repair the United States following the Civil War. Engaging in this study allows students to recognize the themes of history that span across centuries and leads to a greater appreciation of the development of the United States and the resulting impact on world history.

Middle School U.S. History B

Subject Social Studies
Grade Level Middle School

Description

This is the second segment of a year-long course. In this course, students will explore the history of the United States and analyze the cause and effect in historical events. They will investigate history by using the tools of a historian to examine the historical, geographic, political, economic, and sociological events that influenced the development of the United States. Students will imagine what it was like to live in the past by reading the stories from the people who experienced it. This course begins with the engaging stories of what brought the earliest American colonists to the New World and ends with the struggles to repair the United States following the Civil War. Engaging in this study allows students to recognize the themes of history that span across centuries and leads to a greater appreciation of the development of the United States and the resulting impact on world history.

AP U.S. History (Sem 1)

Subject Social Studies
Grade Level High School

Description

Advanced Placement U.S. History I is a college-level introductory course which examines the nation’s political, diplomatic, intellectual, cultural, social, and economic history from 1491 to 1877. Students are challenged to see American history through a variety of historical themes while developing thinking skills that will help them contextualize specific periods of American history. A college level textbook is supplemented by primary and secondary sources throughout this course. This course does not include the AP exam; students can contact their school’s AP coordinator or guidance counselor to sign up for the exam. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

AP World History: Modern (Sem 2)

Subject Social Studies
Grade Level High School

Description

This is the second course in a two-course sequence. AP Modern World History is a college-level survey course that covers the major global trends, events, changes, and systems from 1200 to the present day. This course consists of seven distinct units that unfold specific topics in specific regions and time within the scope of the following six themes identified by the College Board. The goal of this course is for students to understand the significant factors that have shaped our world today and why/how global societies developed in the manner that they did. Students will be assigned to read varied reading materials, including textbook chapters, and watch instructional videos, and have discussions with their classmates. Throughout the course, students will be challenged to write short and long argumentative essays, analyze sources, compare historical events, make historical connections, and provide historically valid evidence.

AP World History: Modern (Sem 1)

Subject Social Studies
Grade Level High School

Description

This is the first course in a two-course sequence. AP Modern World History is a college-level survey course that covers the major global trends, events, changes, and systems from 1200 to the present day. This course consists of seven distinct units that unfold specific topics in specific regions and time within the scope of the following six themes identified by the College Board. The goal of this course is for students to understand the significant factors that have shaped our world today and why/how global societies developed in the manner that they did. Students will be assigned to read varied reading materials, including textbook chapters, and watch instructional videos, and have discussions with their classmates. Throughout the course, students will be challenged to write short and long argumentative essays, analyze sources, compare historical events, make historical connections, and provide historically valid evidence.

HIS 150: History of the United States, 1877 to Present

Subject Social Studies
Grade Level Dual Enrollment

Description

COURSE RATIONALE: Every student should have an understanding of the history of the country they live in. History helps them to know who they are. History of one’s country helps explain actions/policies that are practiced in that country and the interaction/interdependence upon other nations. CATALOG DESCRIPTION: HIS 150: History of the United States, 1877 to Present. This course deals with the United States from 1877 to the present. Such topics as the transformation to an urban-industrial nation, the emergence of the U.S. as a world power including the world wars and the Depression. The last part of the course describes the Cold War, the civil rights movement, Vietnam and the new politics. This course may be taken before HIS 149.

HIS 102: History of Western Civilization Since 1715

Subject Social Studies
Grade Level Dual Enrollment

Description

COURSE RATIONALE: All students should have an understanding of the history of western civilization to help them understand why countries have the policies and traditions they do. This course fulfills part of the Global Awareness Competency Requirement. CATALOG DESCRIPTION: HIS 102: History of Western Civilization Since 1715. This course moves the development of Western Civilization from the Enlightenment to the French Revolution and Napoleon and the Industrial Revolution through the 19th century to explain nationalism, communism, fascism, collective security, the Cold War, and other major experiences of the 20th century world. History 102 may be taken before History 101.

U.S. History and Geography A

Subject Social Studies
Grade Level High School

Description

This is the first course of a two-course sequence. The purpose of U.S. history instruction is to foster civic-mindedness, global awareness, and social responsibility. Historical knowledge can empower the development of American citizenship values, active participation, and informed decision-making based on critical inquiry and analysis.. Assignments include short-form free response essays, primary document analysis, and investigative projects. Students will develop social studies-specific skills, including chronological reasoning, historical interpretation of perspective, inquiry, causal thinking, and argumentation.

U.S. History and Geography B

Subject Social Studies
Grade Level High School

Description

This is the second course of a two-course sequence. The purpose of U.S. history instruction is to foster civic-mindedness, global awareness, and social responsibility. Historical knowledge can empower the development of American citizenship values, active participation, and informed decision-making based on critical inquiry and analysis. Assignments include short-form free response essays, primary document analysis, and investigative projects. Students will develop social studies-specific skills, including chronological reasoning, historical interpretation of perspective, inquiry, causal thinking, and argumentation.

HIS 101: History of Western Civilization to 1715

Subject Social Studies
Grade Level Dual Enrollment

Description

COURSE RATIONALE: All students should have an understanding of the history of western civilization to help them understand why countries have the policies and traditions they do. CATALOG DESCRIPTION: HIS 101: History of Western Civilization to 1715. The evolution of the modern Western world is surveyed from its ancient and medieval cultural footings to the making of contemporary cultural premises.

Essentials World History A

Subject Social Studies
Grade Level High School

Description

Join modern time travelers Ali and Soo-jin as they journey through World History and help students discover how world events and eras are connected. In Segment 1, students will learn how the Roman Empire developed in two very distinct directions. Next, students will discover the great intellectual and cultural contributions of the Islamic Empires. They will journey through the Middle Ages of Europe and Japan to learn how knights and samurais lived. While investigating the rise and fall of some of the great kingdoms of the Americas and Africa and then travel back to the Europe of the Renaissance and Reformation era. Segment 2 begins with a bang as students learn about advancements in science and thought during the Age of Enlightenment, as well as the social and political revolutions that followed as a result. As students meander through the 19th century, they will learn about the transformation from an agricultural to an industrial world and the many changes that resulted from that shift. Students will then learn about the interconnectedness of nationalism and colonialism and the two massive world wars that were the end result. As students approach the finish line, they will learn about development in our modern world and the implications that historical events have on us today. This course is not NCAA eligible.

Essentials World History B

Subject Social Studies
Grade Level High School

Description

Join modern time travelers Ali and Soo-jin as they journey through World History and help students discover how world events and eras are connected. In Segment 1, students will learn how the Roman Empire developed in two very distinct directions. Next, students will discover the great intellectual and cultural contributions of the Islamic Empires. They will journey through the Middle Ages of Europe and Japan to learn how knights and samurais lived. While investigating the rise and fall of some of the great kingdoms of the Americas and Africa and then travel back to the Europe of the Renaissance and Reformation era. Segment 2 begins with a bang as students learn about advancements in science and thought during the Age of Enlightenment, as well as the social and political revolutions that followed as a result. As students meander through the 19th century, they will learn about the transformation from an agricultural to an industrial world and the many changes that resulted from that shift. Students will then learn about the interconnectedness of nationalism and colonialism and the two massive world wars that were the end result. As students approach the finish line, they will learn about development in our modern world and the implications that historical events have on us today. This course is not NCAA eligible.

Essentials U.S. History A

Subject Social Studies
Grade Level High School

Description

This is a survey course of United States history focusing on the period from the Civil War through the present. The United States began as an experiment in freedom and democracy. Since its establishment, the country and its people have endured social, political and economic revolutions. In this course, students will investigate the people, events and ideas that have shaped the United States. Students are asked to analyze and evaluate decisions made by political, business, and military leaders. Emphasis is placed on connections between events of the past and present. This course is not NCAA eligible.

Essentials U.S. History B

Subject Social Studies
Grade Level High School

Description

This is a survey course of United States history focusing on the period from the Civil War through the present. The United States began as an experiment in freedom and democracy. Since its establishment, the country and its people have endured social, political and economic revolutions. In this course, students will investigate the people, events and ideas that have shaped the United States. Students are asked to analyze and evaluate decisions made by political, business, and military leaders. Emphasis is placed on connections between events of the past and present. This course is not NCAA eligible.

Middle School World History B

Subject Social Studies
Grade Level Middle School

Description

Somebody discovered the wheel. Somebody discovered written communication. Somebody even figured out how to count to ten. From the ancient river civilizations to China and its ancient dynasties, different civilizations left their mark on history. They also left their mark on how we live today. In this course, students join travel agent Mr. Lightfoot to travel back in time digging out the past of these ancient civilizations. In ancient Egypt students visit the pyramids and find out the secrets of preserving mummies. They see how the Mayans developed astronomy to a precise science. They even investigate the difference between the Athenians and the Spartans. Students will journey through India discovering their contributions to medicine, moving on to Africa to follow the rise and fall of the ancient east African kingdoms of Kush and Axum. Throughout the centuries, and still today, our world is made up of dozens of different cultures. They all are different, and they all have made big contributions to what we know and who we are.

Middle School World History A

Subject Social Studies
Grade Level Middle School

Description

Somebody discovered the wheel. Somebody discovered written communication. Somebody even figured out how to count to ten. From the ancient river civilizations to China and its ancient dynasties, different civilizations left their mark on history. They also left their mark on how we live today. In this course, students join travel agent Mr. Lightfoot to travel back in time digging out the past of these ancient civilizations. In ancient Egypt students visit the pyramids and find out the secrets of preserving mummies. They see how the Mayans developed astronomy to a precise science. They even investigate the difference between the Athenians and the Spartans. Students will journey through India discovering their contributions to medicine, moving on to Africa to follow the rise and fall of the ancient east African kingdoms of Kush and Axum. Throughout the centuries, and still today, our world is made up of dozens of different cultures. They all are different, and they all have made big contributions to what we know and who we are.

World History and Geography A

Subject Social Studies
Grade Level High School

Description

This course is the first course of a two-course sequence offering a comparative study of how and why economic, social, political and intellectual factors shaped and defined the history of Western and non-Western civilizations in the ancient, medieval, and early modern eras. This course also incorporates a geographical perspective to help students visualize, comprehend, and ask questions about why the human and physical systems occur in particular patterns and combinations, where they are on Earth’s surface, why they are there, and the consequences for people and the environment. This course has been designed to align with the principles of the State of Michigan’s High School Social Studies Content Standards and Expectations.

Native American History

Subject Social Studies
Grade Level High School

Description

This course provides an introduction to Native American history in North America and the Caribbean. Students will consider the varied societies Native peoples built before Europeans arrived and the challenges that the arrival of Europeans posed to them. Students will especially focus on the relationship between the United States and Native Americans, particularly as it has been understood by Native Americans themselves in their struggles for land, sovereignty, and identity.

World History and Geography B

Subject Social Studies
Grade Level High School

Description

This course is the second course of a two-course sequence offering a comparative study of how and why selected economic, social, political, and intellectual revolutions of the modern world have transformed and shaped contemporary European and non-Western cultures. This course also incorporates a geographical perspective to help students visualize, comprehend, and ask questions about why the human and physical systems occur in particular patterns and combinations, where they are on Earth’s surface, why they are there, and the consequences for people and the environment. This course has been designed to align with the principles of the State of Michigan’s High School Social Studies Content Standards and Expectations and the Common Core State Standards.

Keep up with the latest Michigan Virtual has to offer

Limited Course Capacity

We’re sorry to inform you that we have reached capacity for several of our Semester 1 and Trimester 1 courses. You’ll notice when attempting to enroll students in our Student Learning Portal that some courses are unavailable. While we are no longer accepting new enrollments for these courses at this time, many courses continue to remain open for enrollment.

With many students across the state 100% remote, demand for our online courses is greater than ever before. Because every course we offer is taught by a Michigan-certified teacher, this high volume of enrollments has created capacity issues for our teachers who provide each and every student with individual feedback.

While the Michigan Virtual team anticipated and planned for significant increases in student enrollments this Fall, the increased demand we’ve experienced has been unprecedented. As a result, we are taking steps to hire even more part-and full-time teachers to support larger numbers of student enrollments for Semester 2 as well as for Trimester 2 and 3. 

For schools that still need online learning options this year, please fill out the form at the bottom of our virtual pathways page to meet with someone to discuss other solutions. While some of our teacher-led courses are full, we may still have the capacity to help you in upcoming terms or can discuss timing to implement a whole-school or collaborative program in which local teachers from your school/district use our online course content to teach students. We also have free course content and resources available for you to use.

We know this is an incredibly stressful time for all, and we’re sorry if the courses you’re looking for are unavailable. We never want to turn away a student who wants to learn from us. Our top concern, however, is student success, and we have a policy to not take on additional enrollments if we cannot guarantee that all students will have a quality online learning experience. 

We appreciate your patience and understanding as we navigate the unusually high volume of enrollments we are receiving.