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Advanced Placement U.S. History II is a college-level introductory course which examines the nation’s political, diplomatic, intellectual, cultural, social, and economic history from 1865 to Present. This course will continue the study of American history that was begun in Advanced Placement US History I. Students are challenged to see American history through a variety of historical themes while developing thinking skills that will help them to contextualize specific periods of American history. A college level textbook is supplemented by primary and secondary sources throughout this course. This course does not include the AP exam; students can contact their school’s AP coordinator or guidance counselor to sign up for the exam. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

Advanced Placement U.S. History I is a college-level introductory course which examines the nation’s political, diplomatic, intellectual, cultural, social, and economic history from 1491 to 1877. Students are challenged to see American history through a variety of historical themes while developing thinking skills that will help them contextualize specific periods of American history. A college level textbook is supplemented by primary and secondary sources throughout this course. This course does not include the AP exam; students can contact their school’s AP coordinator or guidance counselor to sign up for the exam. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

This is the second course of a two-course sequence. The purpose of U.S. history instruction is to foster civic-mindedness, global awareness, and social responsibility. Historical knowledge can empower the development of American citizenship values, active participation, and informed decision-making based on critical inquiry and analysis. Assignments include short-form free response essays, primary document analysis, and investigative projects. Students will develop social studies-specific skills, including chronological reasoning, historical interpretation of perspective, inquiry, causal thinking, and argumentation.

This is the first course of a two-course sequence. The purpose of U.S. history instruction is to foster civic-mindedness, global awareness, and social responsibility. Historical knowledge can empower the development of American citizenship values, active participation, and informed decision-making based on critical inquiry and analysis.. Assignments include short-form free response essays, primary document analysis, and investigative projects. Students will develop social studies-specific skills, including chronological reasoning, historical interpretation of perspective, inquiry, causal thinking, and argumentation.

This is the second segment of a year-long course. In this course, students will explore the history of the United States and analyze the cause and effect in historical events. They will investigate history by using the tools of a historian to examine the historical, geographic, political, economic, and sociological events that influenced the development of the United States. Students will imagine what it was like to live in the past by reading the stories from the people who experienced it. This course begins with the engaging stories of what brought the earliest American colonists to the New World and ends with the struggles to repair the United States following the Civil War. Engaging in this study allows students to recognize the themes of history that span across centuries and leads to a greater appreciation of the development of the United States and the resulting impact on world history.

This is the first segment of a year-long course. In this course, students will explore the history of the United States and analyze the cause and effect in historical events. They will investigate history by using the tools of a historian to examine the historical, geographic, political, economic, and sociological events that influenced the development of the United States. Students will imagine what it was like to live in the past by reading the stories from the people who experienced it. This course begins with the engaging stories of what brought the earliest American colonists to the New World and ends with the struggles to repair the United States following the Civil War. Engaging in this study allows students to recognize the themes of history that span across centuries and leads to a greater appreciation of the development of the United States and the resulting impact on world history.

This is a survey course of United States history focusing on the period from the Civil War through the present. The United States began as an experiment in freedom and democracy. Since its establishment, the country and its people have endured social, political and economic revolutions. In this course, students will investigate the people, events and ideas that have shaped the United States. Students are asked to analyze and evaluate decisions made by political, business, and military leaders. Emphasis is placed on connections between events of the past and present. This course is not NCAA eligible.

This is a survey course of United States history focusing on the period from the Civil War through the present. The United States began as an experiment in freedom and democracy. Since its establishment, the country and its people have endured social, political and economic revolutions. In this course, students will investigate the people, events and ideas that have shaped the United States. Students are asked to analyze and evaluate decisions made by political, business, and military leaders. Emphasis is placed on connections between events of the past and present. This course is not NCAA eligible.

COURSE RATIONALE: Every student should have an understanding of the history of the country they live in. History helps them to know who they are. History of one’s country helps explain actions/policies that are practiced in that country and the interaction/interdependence upon other nations. CATALOG DESCRIPTION: HIS 150: History of the United States, 1877 to Present. This course deals with the United States from 1877 to the present. Such topics as the transformation to an urban-industrial nation, the emergence of the U.S. as a world power including the world wars and the Depression. The last part of the course describes the Cold War, the civil rights movement, Vietnam and the new politics. This course may be taken before HIS 149.

Limited Course Capacity

We’re sorry to inform you that we have reached capacity for several of our Semester 1 and Trimester 1 courses. You’ll notice when attempting to enroll students in our Student Learning Portal that some courses are unavailable. While we are no longer accepting new enrollments for these courses at this time, many courses continue to remain open for enrollment.

With many students across the state 100% remote, demand for our online courses is greater than ever before. Because every course we offer is taught by a Michigan-certified teacher, this high volume of enrollments has created capacity issues for our teachers who provide each and every student with individual feedback.

While the Michigan Virtual team anticipated and planned for significant increases in student enrollments this Fall, the increased demand we’ve experienced has been unprecedented. As a result, we are taking steps to hire even more part-and full-time teachers to support larger numbers of student enrollments for Semester 2 as well as for Trimester 2 and 3. 

For schools that still need online learning options this year, please fill out the form at the bottom of our virtual pathways page to meet with someone to discuss other solutions. While some of our teacher-led courses are full, we may still have the capacity to help you in upcoming terms or can discuss timing to implement a whole-school or collaborative program in which local teachers from your school/district use our online course content to teach students. We also have free course content and resources available for you to use.

We know this is an incredibly stressful time for all, and we’re sorry if the courses you’re looking for are unavailable. We never want to turn away a student who wants to learn from us. Our top concern, however, is student success, and we have a policy to not take on additional enrollments if we cannot guarantee that all students will have a quality online learning experience. 

We appreciate your patience and understanding as we navigate the unusually high volume of enrollments we are receiving.