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How have African Americans shaped the culture of the United States throughout history? Tracing the accomplishments and obstacles of African Americans from the slave trade through emancipation, and to the modern African diaspora, you will learn about the political, economic, social, religious, and cultural factors that have influenced African American life. In African American History, you’ll come face to face with individuals who changed the course of history and learn more about slavery, racism, and the Civil Rights Movement. You will also explore how the history of African Americans influences current events today.

The aim of anthropology is to use a broad approach to gain an understanding of the past, present, and future, as well as address the problems humans face in biological, social, and cultural life. This course will explore the evolution, similarity and diversity of mankind through time. It will look at how we have evolved from a biologically and culturally weak species to one that has the ability to cause catastrophic change or amazing innovation, shedding light on how we forged our way and developed all of the things that make us human, such as our cultures, languages, and religions. Exciting online video journeys to different areas of the world will also be presented in this course.

This is the first course in a two-course sequence. In this college level course, students will systematically study the geographic patterns and processes that have shaped our understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students will employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human social organization and its environmental consequences, and will also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice. Students will prepare to take the College Board Advanced Placement Human Geography Examination and possibly receive college course credit. This course is rigorous, fast paced, and requires extensive reading and writing. Students will learn how to approach both the multiple-choice questions and the free-response questions on the AP Exam. In addition, students will engage in class discussions and apply concepts learned to aspects of the real world. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

This is the first semester of a two semester course sequence. AP Human Geography introduces high school students to college-level introductory human geography or cultural geography. The content is presented thematically, in alignment with the College Board’s AP Human Geography Course and Exam Description, rather than regionally and is organized around the discipline’s main subfields: economic geography, cultural geography, political geography, and urban geography. The approach is spatial and problem oriented. Case studies are drawn from all world regions, with an emphasis on understanding the world in which we live today. Historical information serves to enrich analysis of the impacts of phenomena such as globalization, colonialism, and human–environment relationships on places, regions, cultural landscapes, and patterns of interaction. Students also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their research and applications. Students should be able to read college level texts and write grammatically correct, complete sentences.

This is the second course in a two-course sequence. In this college level course, students will systematically study the geographic patterns and processes that have shaped our understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students will employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human social organization and its environmental consequences, and will also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice. Students will prepare to take the College Board Advanced Placement Human Geography Examination and possibly receive college course credit. This course is rigorous, fast paced, and requires extensive reading and writing. Students will learn how to approach both the multiple-choice questions and the free-response questions on the AP Exam. In addition, students will engage in class discussions and apply concepts learned to aspects of the real world. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

This is the second semester of a two semester course sequence. AP Human Geography introduces high school students to college-level introductory human geography or cultural geography. The content is presented thematically, in alignment with the College Board’s AP Human Geography Course and Exam Description, rather than regionally and is organized around the discipline’s main subfields: economic geography, cultural geography, political geography, and urban geography. The approach is spatial and problem oriented. Case studies are drawn from all world regions, with an emphasis on understanding the world in which we live today. Historical information serves to enrich analysis of the impacts of phenomena such as globalization, colonialism, and human–environment relationships on places, regions, cultural landscapes, and patterns of interaction. Students also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their research and applications. Students should be able to read college level texts and write grammatically correct, complete sentences.

This single semester course introduces students to the economic principles that apply to an entire economic system and focuses on the study of national income and price-level determination as well introducing students to economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth and international economics. Content in each lesson is presented in a variety of formats including a Textbook, videos and other internet resources. Students are given the ability to select from some, or all of these resources, based on their own learning preferences and needs. Regular practice opportunities allow students to gauge their understanding and preparedness before attempting graded quizzes and tests. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

This single semester course introduces students to the economic principles that apply to an entire economic system and focuses on the study of national income and price-level determination as well introducing students to economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth and international economics. Content in each lesson is presented in a variety of formats including a Textbook, videos and other internet resources. Students are given the ability to select from some, or all of these resources, based on their own learning preferences and needs. Regular practice opportunities allow students to gauge their understanding and preparedness before attempting graded quizzes and tests. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

This single-semester course introduces students to the economic principles that apply to consumers and producers in an economic system and focuses on the nature and function of product markets, the study of factor markets and the role of government. Content in each lesson is presented in a variety of formats including a Textbook, videos and other internet resources. Students are given the ability to select from some, or all of these resources, based on their own learning preferences and needs. Regular practice opportunities allow students to gauge their understanding and preparedness before attempting graded quizzes and tests. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

This single-semester course introduces students to the economic principles that apply to consumers and producers in an economic system and focuses on the nature and function of product markets, the study of factor markets and the role of government. Content in each lesson is presented in a variety of formats including a Textbook, videos and other internet resources. Students are given the ability to select from some, or all of these resources, based on their own learning preferences and needs. Regular practice opportunities allow students to gauge their understanding and preparedness before attempting graded quizzes and tests. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

This is the first course in a two-course sequence. This course is designed to meet the expectations of the College Board. According to the College Board, “The AP Psychology course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice.” This course covers the following units: History and Approaches, Research Methods, Biological Bases of Behavior, Sensation and Perception, State of Consciousness, Learning, and Cognition. Students will learn how to approach both the multiple-choice questions and the free-response questions on the AP Exam. In addition, students will engage in class discussions and apply concepts learned to aspects of the real world. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

This is the second course in a two-course sequence. This course is designed to meet the expectations of the College Board. According to the College Board, “The AP Psychology course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice.” This course covers the following units: Motivation and Emotion, Developmental Psychology, Personality, Testing and Individual Differences, Abnormal Behavior, Treatment of Abnormal Behavior, and Social Psychology. Students will learn how to approach both the multiple-choice questions and the free-response questions on the AP Exam. In addition, students will engage in class discussions and apply concepts learned to aspects of the real world. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

This one-semester course will give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. The course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific examples. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs and ideas that constitute U.S. politics. Students will become acquainted with the variety of theoretical perspectives and explanations for various behaviors and outcomes. Regular practice opportunities allow students to gauge their understanding and preparedness before attempting graded quizzes and tests. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

This one-semester course will give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. The course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific examples. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs and ideas that constitute U.S. politics. Students will become acquainted with the variety of theoretical perspectives and explanations for various behaviors and outcomes. Regular practice opportunities allow students to gauge their understanding and preparedness before attempting graded quizzes and tests. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

Advanced Placement U.S. History I is a college-level introductory course which examines the nation’s political, diplomatic, intellectual, cultural, social, and economic history from 1491 to 1877. Students are challenged to see American history through a variety of historical themes while developing thinking skills that will help them contextualize specific periods of American history. A college level textbook is supplemented by primary and secondary sources throughout this course. This course does not include the AP exam; students can contact their school’s AP coordinator or guidance counselor to sign up for the exam. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

Advanced Placement U.S. History II is a college-level introductory course which examines the nation’s political, diplomatic, intellectual, cultural, social, and economic history from 1865 to Present. This course will continue the study of American history that was begun in Advanced Placement US History I. Students are challenged to see American history through a variety of historical themes while developing thinking skills that will help them to contextualize specific periods of American history. A college level textbook is supplemented by primary and secondary sources throughout this course. This course does not include the AP exam; students can contact their school’s AP coordinator or guidance counselor to sign up for the exam. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

This is the first course in a two-course sequence. AP Modern World History is a college-level survey course that covers the major global trends, events, changes, and systems from 1200 to the present day. This course consists of seven distinct units that unfold specific topics in specific regions and time within the scope of the following six themes identified by the College Board. The goal of this course is for students to understand the significant factors that have shaped our world today and why/how global societies developed in the manner that they did. Students will be assigned to read varied reading materials, including textbook chapters, and watch instructional videos, and have discussions with their classmates. Throughout the course, students will be challenged to write short and long argumentative essays, analyze sources, compare historical events, make historical connections, and provide historically valid evidence.

This is the second course in a two-course sequence. AP Modern World History is a college-level survey course that covers the major global trends, events, changes, and systems from 1200 to the present day. This course consists of seven distinct units that unfold specific topics in specific regions and time within the scope of the following six themes identified by the College Board. The goal of this course is for students to understand the significant factors that have shaped our world today and why/how global societies developed in the manner that they did. Students will be assigned to read varied reading materials, including textbook chapters, and watch instructional videos, and have discussions with their classmates. Throughout the course, students will be challenged to write short and long argumentative essays, analyze sources, compare historical events, make historical connections, and provide historically valid evidence.

George Santayana once said, “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” The field of archeology helps us to better understand the events and societies of the past that have helped to shape our modern world. This course focuses on these techniques, methods, and theories that guide the study of the past. Students will learn how archaeological research is conducted and interpreted, as well as how artifacts are located and preserved. Finally, students will learn about the relationship of material items to culture and what we can learn about past societies from these items.

This one-semester course prepares students for informed and responsible participation as citizens in the American representative system. Students deepen their awareness of the values expressed in the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and other foundational documents of the United States. Students learn the purposes and structures of government within the American federal system. Students gain a deeper understanding of the role of the United States in its relations with other nations. Students also learn how citizens exert influence on public affairs and decisions. By participating in this course, students are better prepared to exercise the rights and responsibilities of American citizenship.

Limited Course Capacity

We’re sorry to inform you that we have reached capacity for several of our Semester 1 and Trimester 1 courses. You’ll notice when attempting to enroll students in our Student Learning Portal that some courses are unavailable. While we are no longer accepting new enrollments for these courses at this time, many courses continue to remain open for enrollment.

With many students across the state 100% remote, demand for our online courses is greater than ever before. Because every course we offer is taught by a Michigan-certified teacher, this high volume of enrollments has created capacity issues for our teachers who provide each and every student with individual feedback.

While the Michigan Virtual team anticipated and planned for significant increases in student enrollments this Fall, the increased demand we’ve experienced has been unprecedented. As a result, we are taking steps to hire even more part-and full-time teachers to support larger numbers of student enrollments for Semester 2 as well as for Trimester 2 and 3. 

For schools that still need online learning options this year, please fill out the form at the bottom of our virtual pathways page to meet with someone to discuss other solutions. While some of our teacher-led courses are full, we may still have the capacity to help you in upcoming terms or can discuss timing to implement a whole-school or collaborative program in which local teachers from your school/district use our online course content to teach students. We also have free course content and resources available for you to use.

We know this is an incredibly stressful time for all, and we’re sorry if the courses you’re looking for are unavailable. We never want to turn away a student who wants to learn from us. Our top concern, however, is student success, and we have a policy to not take on additional enrollments if we cannot guarantee that all students will have a quality online learning experience. 

We appreciate your patience and understanding as we navigate the unusually high volume of enrollments we are receiving.