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This course is the second in a two-course sequence. This course presents a fascinating, in-depth exploration of the structure and function of the human body. The course will use a systems approach and will emphasize how organs and body systems work together to carry on complex processes. Concepts and principles will be related to familiar health issues, problems and experiences we face as humans. Upon completion of this course, students will have a thorough understanding of the human body and how its parts work together to maintain the delicate equilibrium of life.

Astronomy provides a broad overview of all topics in astronomy for the beginner. The course provides a foundation to the science of astronomy including motions in the night sky and the tools of modern astronomy. It contains the most up-to-date science about our solar system, stars and galaxies. Astronomy also explores the exciting prospects for future discovery in astronomy including life in the universe and the mysteries that continue to perplex astronomers. The course provides an engaging combination of videos, interactive media, photo galleries and readings so that students can explore the content in a variety of ways.

Bioethics is a one-semester course designed to raise student awareness of the social and ethical implications of life science, medicine, and biotechnology. This course focuses on building critical thinking and analytical skills using a variety of strategies and higher-order thinking opportunities appropriate to the resolution of controversial medical and scientific dilemmas. Topics include organ donation, the use of animals in medical research, healthcare coverage, and genetic engineering. Students enrolled in this course will build and use compassion and empathy skills to participate in healthy and safe text-based and video discussions.

Chemistry is the study of the composition, structure, and properties of matter and the changes it undergoes. Matter is all the “stuff” around us. In this first semester class you will learn about atomic structure, physical and chemical change, chemical bonding, naming compounds, percentage composition and molecular geometry. Since chemistry is a laboratory based course, each unit will include a lab simulation and/or a kitchen lab experience.

The second semester of chemistry will cover a whole set of new topics, using the skills mastered in the first semester. The major units will be Stoichiometry, nuclear reactions, reaction rates, acids, bases and salts and thermochemistry. Again, a working knowledge of algebra and geometry will aid the student at being successful in Chemistry!

Earth Science A is the first-semester in a two-course sequence designed to expose the student to the scientific study of the Earth. Students will learn how observation and experimentation are used to gain knowledge about the Earth’s past and present and used in making predictions about Earth’s future. Students will gain an understanding of the inner workings of Earth systems, including water and rock cycles, and how they influence the environments on the planet.

This is the second course in a two-course sequence. Earth Science B is the second-semester course designed to expose the student to the scientific study of the Earth. Students will learn how observation and experimentation are used to gain knowledge about the Earth’s past and present and used in making predictions about Earth’s future. The course emphasis is on astronomy, meteorology, and hydrology. The course will include outside readings, labs and the application of learned material to everyday problems.

Environmental science is an integrated science course that continues to develop conceptual understanding of the interactions in Earth science, physical science, and life science systems. The standards for environmental science engage students in the core ideas, scientific and engineering practices, and crosscutting concepts to support the development of knowledge that can be applied to understanding, explaining,and improving human interactions with Earth systems and resources. There are strong connections to mathematical practices of analyzing and interpreting data with creating mathematical and computational models.

This Biology course is designed to give students a fundamental look at the characteristics of living organisms and their environment. Students will be introduced to the structure, function, diversity and evolution of living matter. The course provides scientific inquiry and discovery by incorporating hands on labs and a variety of web-based activities that engage the student in their study of the biological life that surrounds us all. This course is not NCAA eligible.

This Biology course is designed to give students a fundamental look at the characteristics of living organisms and their environment. Students will be introduced to the structure, function, diversity and evolution of living matter. The course provides scientific inquiry and discovery by incorporating hands on labs and a variety of web-based activities that engage the student in their study of the biological life that surrounds us all. This course is not NCAA eligible.

This is an interactive 21st century course focusing on a variety of topics including; the composition and structure of materials and the changes they undergo. Utilizing technology and foundational scientific inquiry, students explore how chemistry impacts the world around them and in their everyday life. This course provides students with the opportunity to gain scientific knowledge by planning investigations, making observations, collecting and analyzing data, performing peer reviews, and collaborating with other students. This course is not NCAA eligible.

This is an interactive 21st century course focusing on a variety of topics including; the composition and structure of materials and the changes they undergo. Utilizing technology and foundational scientific inquiry, students explore how chemistry impacts the world around them and in their everyday life. This course provides students with the opportunity to gain scientific knowledge by planning investigations, making observations, collecting and analyzing data, performing peer reviews, and collaborating with other students. This course is not NCAA eligible.

This course provides students with a basic introduction to the field of forensic science. Students will discover the various roles and responsibilities associated with a career in forensics. Students will learn basic crime scene analysis skills used by investigators in both the field and lab. In addition, students will be given an overview of the various forms of evidence left by criminals at the scene of the crime as well as the opportunity to apply this knowledge to hypothetical situations. Special focus will be placed on real world application of the knowledge presented to allow students a chance to experience some of what forensic scientists experience on a daily basis. Please note: In some lessons, students will be asked to use household items to recreate the content in the lesson. In such cases, multiple options will be available in an attempt to accommodate the diverse situations of our students. Some examples of materials that may be needed could include but are not limited to, modeling clay, tape, hand tools, etc. Additionally, since this is an online course, students may be asked to provide documentation of their work to ensure authenticity. Typically, this is accomplished by having students provide a digital image of their work. Therefore, students will need to have access to a camera or some form of image capturing device (cell phone, webcam, etc.). Graphic content notification: Due to the nature of this course, some content may be disturbing to some students. Images of dead and decaying bodies, as well as content that involves murder cases, drug overdoses, and sexual assault, will be addressed.

Medical terminology is designed to teach students the language used in medicine and healthcare. Students build a strong foundation through the study of prefixes, suffixes, and root words and study the structure and origin of common medical terms with a focus on correct pronunciation, spelling, and application of medical terms. Students will take a systematic approach to the systems of the body by learning the basic structure and function of the system as well as medical terms related to pathology, diagnosis, clinical procedures, pharmacology, and abbreviations specific to that system. Students will learn to communicate in medical language and interpret complex medical communications into everyday language.

This is the first semester of a two-semester course. This course is designed as an interactive, 21st century course focusing on basic physics and chemistry. Topics include forces and motion, energy through waves, electricity and magnetism, the matter around us, chemical bonding and reactions. This course is designed to serve as a foundation for the study of the physical sciences. The utilization of scientific inquiry, web 2.0 tools, interactive experiences, higher order thinking, collaborative projects, real world application through labs and a variety of assessments all aid the student in ultimately demonstrating a vast understanding of the importance of the physical and chemical properties of the world around them; enabling them to apply these properties to their everyday lives.

This is the second semester of a two-semester course. This course is designed as an interactive, 21st century course focusing on basic physics and chemistry. Topics include forces and motion, energy through waves, electricity and magnetism, the matter around us, chemical bonding and reactions. This course is designed to serve as a foundation for the study of the physical sciences. The utilization of scientific inquiry, web 2.0 tools, interactive experiences, higher order thinking, collaborative projects, real world application through labs and a variety of assessments all aid the student in ultimately demonstrating a vast understanding of the importance of the physical and chemical properties of the world around them; enabling them to apply these properties to their everyday lives.

This is the first semester in a two-semester course sequence. This course examines physics, the study of the world around us and the laws of nature that govern that world. The first semester of physics will cover key mathematics used in Physics, as well as the topics of motion (one dimensional and projectile motion), forces, Newton’s Laws, gravity, circular motion, collisions and momentum, work and energy. This is an algebra-based introductory high school physics class. A student who has completed geometry is well prepared for this course work.

This is the second semester in a two-semester course sequence. This course covers the second semester of high school physics. Lessons require use of the skills mastered in the first semester of this two-semester course. Topics of study include waves, heat, electricity and magnetism. The study of light will concentrate on reflection, refraction, and lenses, while electricity will contain the subtopics of static electricity (Coulomb’s Law), current flow using Ohm’s Law and series and parallel circuit design, and capacitors. A working knowledge of algebra and geometry will aid the student at being successful in physics!

As animals play an increasingly important role in our lives, scientists have sought to learn more about their health and well being. Taking a look at the pets that live on our homes, on our farms, and in zoos and wildlife sanctuaries, this course will examine some of the common diseases and treatments for domestic animals. Toxins, parasites, and infectious diseases impact not only the animals around us, but at times, we humans as well! Through veterinary medicine and science, the prevention and treatment of diseases and health issues is studied and applied.

Limited Course Capacity

We’re sorry to inform you that we have reached capacity for several of our Semester 1 and Trimester 1 courses. You’ll notice when attempting to enroll students in our Student Learning Portal that some courses are unavailable. While we are no longer accepting new enrollments for these courses at this time, many courses continue to remain open for enrollment.

With many students across the state 100% remote, demand for our online courses is greater than ever before. Because every course we offer is taught by a Michigan-certified teacher, this high volume of enrollments has created capacity issues for our teachers who provide each and every student with individual feedback.

While the Michigan Virtual team anticipated and planned for significant increases in student enrollments this Fall, the increased demand we’ve experienced has been unprecedented. As a result, we are taking steps to hire even more part-and full-time teachers to support larger numbers of student enrollments for Semester 2 as well as for Trimester 2 and 3. 

For schools that still need online learning options this year, please fill out the form at the bottom of our virtual pathways page to meet with someone to discuss other solutions. While some of our teacher-led courses are full, we may still have the capacity to help you in upcoming terms or can discuss timing to implement a whole-school or collaborative program in which local teachers from your school/district use our online course content to teach students. We also have free course content and resources available for you to use.

We know this is an incredibly stressful time for all, and we’re sorry if the courses you’re looking for are unavailable. We never want to turn away a student who wants to learn from us. Our top concern, however, is student success, and we have a policy to not take on additional enrollments if we cannot guarantee that all students will have a quality online learning experience. 

We appreciate your patience and understanding as we navigate the unusually high volume of enrollments we are receiving.