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This course is the first in a two-course sequence. This course presents a fascinating, in-depth exploration of the structure and function of the human body. The course will use a systems approach and will emphasize how organs and body systems work together to carry on complex processes. Concepts and principles will be related to familiar health issues, problems and experiences we face as humans. Upon completion of this course, students will have a thorough understanding of the human body and how its parts work together to maintain the delicate equilibrium of life.

This course is the second in a two-course sequence. This course presents a fascinating, in-depth exploration of the structure and function of the human body. The course will use a systems approach and will emphasize how organs and body systems work together to carry on complex processes. Concepts and principles will be related to familiar health issues, problems and experiences we face as humans. Upon completion of this course, students will have a thorough understanding of the human body and how its parts work together to maintain the delicate equilibrium of life.

Astronomy provides a broad overview of all topics in astronomy for the beginner. The course provides a foundation to the science of astronomy including motions in the night sky and the tools of modern astronomy. It contains the most up-to-date science about our solar system, stars and galaxies. Astronomy also explores the exciting prospects for future discovery in astronomy including life in the universe and the mysteries that continue to perplex astronomers. The course provides an engaging combination of videos, interactive media, photo galleries and readings so that students can explore the content in a variety of ways.

Bioethics is a one-semester course designed to raise student awareness of the social and ethical implications of life science, medicine, and biotechnology. This course focuses on building critical thinking and analytical skills using a variety of strategies and higher-order thinking opportunities appropriate to the resolution of controversial medical and scientific dilemmas. Topics include organ donation, the use of animals in medical research, healthcare coverage, and genetic engineering. Students enrolled in this course will build and use compassion and empathy skills to participate in healthy and safe text-based and video discussions.

Biology A introduces students to the scientific method and major concepts of biology from an historical and practical viewpoint. The three major themes of this course are the cell, the molecular basis of heredity, and taxonomy and speciation. Students who take this class will have a deeper appreciation for the complexities of living organisms. Life on this planet, unlike anywhere else in the observable universe, is complex and highly organized. Whether examining life on the molecular or the planetary level, it exhibits a highly organized structure that inspires awe by its genius and complexity. In the last 50 years, discoveries have launched new branches of biology that have transformed the daily routine, from conception to death. New challenges await, such as the current crisis in ecology, global warming, and the resurgence in viral disease. To make rational choices in the 21st century, the citizen must have a basic understanding of biological concepts and the reasoning behind them.

Biology B is a continuation of Biology A. The major concepts covered are population dynamics and evolution. Students explore population dynamics through the study of mutualism, predation, parasitism, and competition. The theory of evolution is presented, along with the many evidences and details that make evolution the backbone of modern biology. From biochemistry to evolution, biology fascinates people. Biochemists first astounded the world by showing that life obeys the same chemical principles as all creation, but that life engineers chemistry to its own needs. Decades later, Darwin shocked the world by suggesting that life evolves according to the conditions of the environment it inhabits. Evolution, often debated and derided, has survived to become a key concept of biology. This second semester of biology examines the wonder of life and its mechanisms.

This is the first course in a two-course sequence. This course is designed to meet both the Michigan Content Standards for Chemistry (Michigan Merit Curriculum) and the literacy standards of Common Core State Standards for Science and Technical Subjects. In this course, students will learn about the composition of matter, its chemical and physical properties, and how these change in chemical reactions. Other topics include measurement and calculations, the scientific method, chemical nomenclature, and energy changes that accompany physical and chemical changes. Each lesson includes a variety of sources of information, including text, videos, interactive simulations and self-check exercises. Students will have hands-on opportunities to conduct investigations at home. Practice exercises are included as well as graded assignments.

This is the second course in a two-course sequence. This course is designed to meet both the Michigan Content Standards for Chemistry (Michigan Merit Curriculum) and the literacy standards of Common Core State Standards for Science and Technical Subjects. It continues the study of chemical reactions with calculations in chemical reactions, rates of reactions, reactions equilibrium, and redox reactions. Other topics include phases of matter, acids and bases, nuclear chemistry, and organic chemistry. Each lesson includes a variety of sources of information, including text, videos, interactive simulations and self-check exercises. Practice exercises are included as well as graded assignments.

This is the first half of a two-semester course. Earth Science A is a first-semester course designed to expose the student to the scientific study of the Earth. Students will learn how observation and experimentation are used to gain knowledge about the Earth’s past and present and used in making predictions about Earth’s future.

This is the second course in a two-course sequence. Earth Science B is the second-semester course designed to expose the student to the scientific study of the Earth. Students will learn how observation and experimentation are used to gain knowledge about the Earth’s past and present and used in making predictions about Earth’s future. The course emphasis is on astronomy, meteorology, and hydrology. The course will include outside readings, labs and the application of learned material to everyday problems.

Environmental science is an integrated science course that continues to develop conceptual understanding of the interactions in Earth science, physical science, and life science systems. The standards for environmental science engage students in the core ideas, scientific and engineering practices, and crosscutting concepts to support the development of knowledge that can be applied to understanding, explaining,and improving human interactions with Earth systems and resources. There are strong connections to mathematical practices of analyzing and interpreting data with creating mathematical and computational models.

Environmental science is an integrated science course that continues to develop conceptual understanding of the interactions in Earth science, physical science, and life science systems. The standards for environmental science engage students in the core ideas, scientific and engineering practices, and crosscutting concepts to support the development of knowledge that can be applied to understanding, explaining, and improving human interactions with Earth systems and resources. There are strong connections to mathematical practices of analyzing and interpreting data with creating mathematical and computational models.

This Biology course is designed to give students a fundamental look at the characteristics of living organisms and their environment. Students will be introduced to the structure, function, diversity and evolution of living matter. The course provides scientific inquiry and discovery by incorporating hands on labs and a variety of web-based activities that engage the student in their study of the biological life that surrounds us all. This course is not NCAA eligible.

This Biology course is designed to give students a fundamental look at the characteristics of living organisms and their environment. Students will be introduced to the structure, function, diversity and evolution of living matter. The course provides scientific inquiry and discovery by incorporating hands on labs and a variety of web-based activities that engage the student in their study of the biological life that surrounds us all. This course is not NCAA eligible.

This is an interactive 21st century course focusing on a variety of topics including; the composition and structure of materials and the changes they undergo. Utilizing technology and foundational scientific inquiry, students explore how chemistry impacts the world around them and in their everyday life. This course provides students with the opportunity to gain scientific knowledge by planning investigations, making observations, collecting and analyzing data, performing peer reviews, and collaborating with other students. This course is not NCAA eligible.

This is an interactive 21st century course focusing on a variety of topics including; the composition and structure of materials and the changes they undergo. Utilizing technology and foundational scientific inquiry, students explore how chemistry impacts the world around them and in their everyday life. This course provides students with the opportunity to gain scientific knowledge by planning investigations, making observations, collecting and analyzing data, performing peer reviews, and collaborating with other students. This course is not NCAA eligible.

This course provides students with a basic introduction to the field of forensic science. Students will discover the various roles and responsibilities associated with a career in forensics. Students will learn basic crime scene analysis skills used by investigators in both the field and lab. In addition, students will be given an overview of the various forms of evidence left by criminals at the scene of the crime as well as the opportunity to apply this knowledge to hypothetical situations. Special focus will be placed on real world application of the knowledge presented to allow students a chance to experience some of what forensic scientists experience on a daily basis. Please note: In some lessons, students will be asked to use household items to recreate the content in the lesson. In such cases, multiple options will be available in an attempt to accommodate the diverse situations of our students. Some examples of materials that may be needed could include but are not limited to, modeling clay, tape, hand tools, etc. Additionally, since this is an online course, students may be asked to provide documentation of their work to ensure authenticity. Typically, this is accomplished by having students provide a digital image of their work. Therefore, students will need to have access to a camera or some form of image capturing device (cell phone, webcam, etc.). Graphic content notification: Due to the nature of this course, some content may be disturbing to some students. Images of dead and decaying bodies, as well as content that involves murder cases, drug overdoses, and sexual assault, will be addressed.

Medical terminology is designed to teach students the language used in medicine and healthcare. Students build a strong foundation through the study of prefixes, suffixes, and root words and study the structure and origin of common medical terms with a focus on correct pronunciation, spelling, and application of medical terms. Students will take a systematic approach to the systems of the body by learning the basic structure and function of the system as well as medical terms related to pathology, diagnosis, clinical procedures, pharmacology, and abbreviations specific to that system. Students will learn to communicate in medical language and interpret complex medical communications into everyday language.

This is semester one of a two-semester course in Oceanography. Students receive an introduction to oceanography including the history of marine science, a discussion of the origin of life (including the Big Bang Theory) and its connection to the ocean, an exploration of the energy of life, and an introduction to ocean life including simple life, invertebrates, and vertebrates. Students explore these topics through a variety of content including an etextbook, videos, and interactives. Each lesson includes a quiz or assignment and each unit culminates in a unit project and unit test. Through the lesson assignments and unit projects, students will demonstrate their knowledge in a variety of ways including presentations, creative projects, hands-on activities, writing and more.

This is semester two of a two-semester course in Oceanography. Students continue the survey of Oceanography begun in Oceanography A course by exploring such topics as air and sea interaction, ocean currents, tides, ecosystems, ocean resources, pollution and conservation. Students explore these topics through a variety of content including an etextbook, videos, and interactives. Each lesson includes a quiz or assignment and each unit culminates in a unit project. Through the lesson assignments and unit projects, students will demonstrate their knowledge in a variety of ways including presentations, creative projects, hands-on activities, writing and more.

Limited Course Capacity

We’re sorry to inform you that we have reached capacity for several of our Semester 1 and Trimester 1 courses. You’ll notice when attempting to enroll students in our Student Learning Portal that some courses are unavailable. While we are no longer accepting new enrollments for these courses at this time, many courses continue to remain open for enrollment.

With many students across the state 100% remote, demand for our online courses is greater than ever before. Because every course we offer is taught by a Michigan-certified teacher, this high volume of enrollments has created capacity issues for our teachers who provide each and every student with individual feedback.

While the Michigan Virtual team anticipated and planned for significant increases in student enrollments this Fall, the increased demand we’ve experienced has been unprecedented. As a result, we are taking steps to hire even more part-and full-time teachers to support larger numbers of student enrollments for Semester 2 as well as for Trimester 2 and 3. 

For schools that still need online learning options this year, please fill out the form at the bottom of our virtual pathways page to meet with someone to discuss other solutions. While some of our teacher-led courses are full, we may still have the capacity to help you in upcoming terms or can discuss timing to implement a whole-school or collaborative program in which local teachers from your school/district use our online course content to teach students. We also have free course content and resources available for you to use.

We know this is an incredibly stressful time for all, and we’re sorry if the courses you’re looking for are unavailable. We never want to turn away a student who wants to learn from us. Our top concern, however, is student success, and we have a policy to not take on additional enrollments if we cannot guarantee that all students will have a quality online learning experience. 

We appreciate your patience and understanding as we navigate the unusually high volume of enrollments we are receiving.