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This is the first course in a two-course sequence. Two major themes for this course are “Leadership at Home” and “Leadership in Society.” Students will address several essential questions related to these themes while reading a variety of works by American authors. In addition to major works, students will read short stories and informational texts, engage in poetry analysis, view informational videos, and write for various purposes. Larger writing assignments include an informative essay and a major research project. Students partake in grammar challenges where they learn about grammar concepts and develop a mastery of their use. In addition to building their writing skills, students learn several reading strategies such as how to use graphic organizers to extract important information, take Cornell notes for an informational text or during a lecture, and summarize to monitor comprehension. Furthermore, students will explore several rhetorical devices and strategies like symbolism, dialect, author’s purpose, foreshadowing, persuasive devices, setting and more.

This is the second course in a two-course sequence and has been redesigned to align to the Common Core Standards. Two major themes for this semester are “Becoming My Own Leader” and “Leading Others.” Students will address several essential questions related to these themes while reading a variety of works by American authors. In addition to major works, students will read short stories and informational texts, engage in poetry analysis, view informational videos, and write for various purposes. Larger writing assignments include an argument essay, a narrative essay, and a business email. As a supplement to these assignments, students will partake in grammar challenges where they learn about grammar concepts and develop a mastery of their use. In addition to building their writing skills, students learn several reading strategies such as how to use graphic organizers to extract important information, take Cornell notes for an informational text or during a lecture, and summarize to monitor comprehension. Furthermore, students will explore several rhetorical devices and strategies like characterization, allusion, word choice and diction, setting, symbolism, point of view, and more.

This is the first course in a two-course sequence. In this course students will read engaging works and explore topics of interest as they develop their reading, writing, and speaking skills. Students will use essential questions to focus on a topic for each unit, such as Transformation of Language and Informed Decision Making.

In this course, students will study and become proficient in the writing process. Students will learn about essay structure and organization through the development of four common types of essays (narrative, informative, argumentative, and compare and contrast) as well as proper format and etiquette to write a formal e-mail. In addition, they will also learn several grammar concepts that involve sentence structure, punctuation, word usage, and guidelines for academic writing, such as an objective tone, MLA formatting, and in-text citations.

This is the first course in a two-course sequence. Students will read engaging works of literature and explore topics of interest as they develop their reading, writing and speaking skills. Students will complete two sets of units that focus on narrative writing and argumentative writing.

This is the second course in a two-course sequence. In this course students will read engaging works and explore topics of interest as they develop their reading, writing, and speaking skills. Students will use essential questions to focus on a topic for each unit. The course is aligned to the Common Core Standards.

This is the first course in a two-course sequence. As students progress through the course, they will explore two main themes, “Courage” and “Choice”, and address essential questions while reading a variety of works. Students will read novels, short stories and informational texts, engage in poetry analysis, view informational videos and write for various purposes. Larger writing assignments include a research project and a narrative essay. As a supplement to these writing assignments, students will partake in grammar challenges where they learn about grammar concepts and develop a mastery of their use. In addition to building their writing skills, students will learn several reading strategies such as how to use graphic organizers to extract important information and summarize to monitor comprehension. Furthermore, students will explore several rhetorical devices and strategies like symbolism, figurative language, theme, setting and more.

This is the second course in a two-course sequence. The two major themes for this semester are “Survival” and “Discovery.” As students progress through these themes, they will address several essential questions related to these themes while reading a variety of works. In addition to major works, students will read short stories and informational texts, engage in poetry analysis, view informational videos, and write for various purposes. Some of the larger writing assignments include a research project and a narrative essay. As a supplement to these writing assignments, students will partake in grammar challenges where they learn about grammar concepts and develop a mastery of their use. In addition to building their writing skills, students will learn several reading strategies such as how to use graphic organizers to extract important information and summarize to monitor comprehension. Furthermore, students will explore several rhetorical devices and strategies like characterization, allusion, word choice and diction, setting, and more.

This full credit course is provided for students who have previously taken English I, and were not successful. Students may take one or both segments of this course. Students will develop language arts skills by reading, writing, listening, viewing, and speaking. Students will learn to use the English language to successfully express themselves. This course is not NCAA eligible.

This full credit course is provided for students who have previously taken English I, and were not successful. Students may take one or both segments of this course. Students will develop language arts skills by reading, writing, listening, viewing, and speaking. Students will learn to use the English language to successfully express themselves. This course is not NCAA eligible.

The purpose of this course is to provide grade 10 students who have not passed English II an opportunity to recover the course credit. This course uses texts of high complexity, integrated language arts study in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language for college and career preparation and readiness. This course is not NCAA eligible.

The purpose of this course is to provide grade 10 students who have not passed English II an opportunity to recover the course credit. This course uses texts of high complexity, integrated language arts study in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language for college and career preparation and readiness. This course is not NCAA eligible.

English III for Credit Recovery is a high school course that covers active reading and analysis of literary and informational texts of high complexity; writing for varied purposes; listening, speaking, and viewing skills; and collaboration for college and career preparation and readiness. Students are exposed to high-complexity texts on a deeper level, spending more time with that text and writing to that text. This course is not NCAA eligible.

English III for Credit Recovery is a high school course that covers active reading and analysis of literary and informational texts of high complexity; writing for varied purposes; listening, speaking, and viewing skills; and collaboration for college and career preparation and readiness. Students are exposed to high-complexity texts on a deeper level, spending more time with that text and writing to that text. This course is not NCAA eligible

English IV Credit Recovery covers reading literature, reading informational text, applying language skills, writing (informational, narrative, and argument), researching and presenting strategies, and speaking and listening skills. Students will be exposed to literature on a deeper level, spending more time with one text and writing to that text. This course is not NCAA eligible.

English IV Credit Recovery covers reading literature, reading informational text, applying language skills, writing (informational, narrative, and argument), researching and presenting strategies, and speaking and listening skills. Students will be exposed to literature on a deeper level, spending more time with one text and writing to that text. This course is not NCAA eligible.

Thomas Jefferson once said, “…were it left to me to decide whether we should have a government without newspapers or newspapers without a government, I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter.” The Founding Fathers believed strongly in a free press, which is why they included it prominently in the First Amendment of the Constitution. This course will not only explore the historical role of journalism in the development of our country, but also how journalists must ethically approach their duties in order to maintain the public trust. You will also learn the basic principles of how to report, interview, and write like a journalist by analyzing and covering news, feature, and sports stories. You will also examine how social media has changed the options available for reporters covering the news.

Since the beginning of time, people have gathered around fires to tell stories of angry gods, harrowing journeys, cunning animals, horrible beasts, and the mighty heroes who vanquished them. Mythology and folklore have provided a way for these colorful stories to spring to life for thousands of years and helped humans make sense of the world. Explore how these compelling tales continue to shape society even today.

What is culture and how has it been conveyed through literature? This course will take students on a journey of self-discovery and cultural awareness by reading literature that tells the stories from various perspectives around the world. Students will strive to recognize the similarities and differences in literature and culture by looking at certain time periods, geographical areas, and themes. The course will involve reading, writing, discussion, critical thinking, and self-discovery as students explore the world through words.

Limited Course Capacity

We’re sorry to inform you that we have reached capacity for several of our Semester 1 and Trimester 1 courses. You’ll notice when attempting to enroll students in our Student Learning Portal that some courses are unavailable. While we are no longer accepting new enrollments for these courses at this time, many courses continue to remain open for enrollment.

With many students across the state 100% remote, demand for our online courses is greater than ever before. Because every course we offer is taught by a Michigan-certified teacher, this high volume of enrollments has created capacity issues for our teachers who provide each and every student with individual feedback.

While the Michigan Virtual team anticipated and planned for significant increases in student enrollments this Fall, the increased demand we’ve experienced has been unprecedented. As a result, we are taking steps to hire even more part-and full-time teachers to support larger numbers of student enrollments for Semester 2 as well as for Trimester 2 and 3. 

For schools that still need online learning options this year, please fill out the form at the bottom of our virtual pathways page to meet with someone to discuss other solutions. While some of our teacher-led courses are full, we may still have the capacity to help you in upcoming terms or can discuss timing to implement a whole-school or collaborative program in which local teachers from your school/district use our online course content to teach students. We also have free course content and resources available for you to use.

We know this is an incredibly stressful time for all, and we’re sorry if the courses you’re looking for are unavailable. We never want to turn away a student who wants to learn from us. Our top concern, however, is student success, and we have a policy to not take on additional enrollments if we cannot guarantee that all students will have a quality online learning experience. 

We appreciate your patience and understanding as we navigate the unusually high volume of enrollments we are receiving.