/ News / Is traditional classroom instruction as good as online learning?

Is traditional classroom instruction as good as online learning?

Share on social media

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on pinterest
Pinterest

LANSING – Online learning is challenging educators to rethink how curriculum is delivered which has led some educators to ask if online learning is as good as face-to-face instruction. MSU associate professor Punya Mishra recently told a group of nearly 100 online teachers that the question should be “is face-to-face instruction as good as online instruction?”

Dr. Mishra, associate professor of educational technology for MSU’s College of Education, was the keynote speaker Aug. 4 at Michigan Virtual’s fifth annual “Collaboration of the Minds” event at The Henry Center in Lansing. Michigan Virtual hosted the two-day event for online educators from around the state, and a few from outside the state, to share information, learn new skills and prepare for another school year. Michigan Virtual will provide approximately 20,000 online course enrollments to middle and high school students during the upcoming school year.

Mishra said that online education can foster powerful learning opportunities for students that may actually be better than some face-to-face teaching methods. For example, online discussion boards provide an opportunity for all students to express their ideas on a topic in a timely fashion, this is difficult to accomplish in a traditional classroom setting.

Michigan Virtual has some of the best trained and most experienced online teachers in the United States. I continued to be impressed by their creativity, professionalism and ongoing willingness to innovate” said Jamey Fitzpatrick, president and CEO of Michigan Virtual.

Mishra, an award-winning teacher, and researcher in the areas of computer-based learning environments and technology integration in teacher learning and professional development told the online teachers that the challenges of online teaching include finding ways to connect with students.

“It takes more effort to feel connected to students online,” Mishra said. “But it can be done.”

The challenge for teachers, Mishra said, is to master the technology, subject area and teaching methods while creating an online presence that is credible to students. But online teaching is not just using a set of technical skills. Like face-to-face instruction, online instruction is a craft that needs to be practiced. Online teachers need to explore, create and share their insights to provide solutions to help all students learn.

###

About Michigan Virtual

Michigan Virtual™ (formally known as Michigan Virtual University®) provides online courses for Michigan students, professional development for educators and is the parent organization of the Michigan Virtual Learning Research Institute®. As a nonprofit organization with more than 20 years of experience, Michigan Virtual is Michigan’s leading voice in online education. Visit us at michiganvirtual.org.

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on pinterest
Pinterest

Keep up with the latest Michigan Virtual has to offer

Limited Course Capacity

We’re sorry to inform you that we have reached capacity for several of our Semester 1 and Trimester 1 courses. You’ll notice when attempting to enroll students in our Student Learning Portal that some courses are unavailable. While we are no longer accepting new enrollments for these courses at this time, many courses continue to remain open for enrollment.

With many students across the state 100% remote, demand for our online courses is greater than ever before. Because every course we offer is taught by a Michigan-certified teacher, this high volume of enrollments has created capacity issues for our teachers who provide each and every student with individual feedback.

While the Michigan Virtual team anticipated and planned for significant increases in student enrollments this Fall, the increased demand we’ve experienced has been unprecedented. As a result, we are taking steps to hire even more part-and full-time teachers to support larger numbers of student enrollments for Semester 2 as well as for Trimester 2 and 3. 

For schools that still need online learning options this year, please fill out the form at the bottom of our virtual pathways page to meet with someone to discuss other solutions. While some of our teacher-led courses are full, we may still have the capacity to help you in upcoming terms or can discuss timing to implement a whole-school or collaborative program in which local teachers from your school/district use our online course content to teach students. We also have free course content and resources available for you to use.

We know this is an incredibly stressful time for all, and we’re sorry if the courses you’re looking for are unavailable. We never want to turn away a student who wants to learn from us. Our top concern, however, is student success, and we have a policy to not take on additional enrollments if we cannot guarantee that all students will have a quality online learning experience. 

We appreciate your patience and understanding as we navigate the unusually high volume of enrollments we are receiving.